Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Purpose:

The framework aims to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries over the next 15 years.

The framework applies to the risk of small-scale and large-scale, frequent and infrequent, sudden and slow-onset disasters, caused by natural or manmade hazards as well as related environmental, technological and biological hazards and risks. It aims to guide the multi-hazard management of disaster risk in development at all levels as well as within and across all sectors.

Overview:

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 outlines seven clear targets and four priorities for action to prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks: (i) Understanding disaster risk; (ii) Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; (iii) Investing in disaster reduction for resilience and; (iv) Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.

The Framework was adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan, on March 18, 2015.

Usage: Policy reference

See also: Chart of the Framework A3 | Chart of the Framework (simplified) A4

Sendai Framework Chart

Sendai Framework Chart

Sendai Framework simplified chart

Sendai Framework simplified chart

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Gender dynamics in a changing climate: how gender and adaptive capacity affect resilience

Gender dynamics in a changing climate: how gender and adaptive capacity affect resilience

Purpose:

The brief identifies the factors shaping gender dynamics and adaptive capacity and gives examples of how to integrate gender into community based adaptation approaches as well as outlining knowledge gaps and recommendations for policy and practice.

This learning brief synthesises lessons drawn from CARE’s Adaptation Learning Programme for Africa (ALP), which has been supporting vulnerable communities in sub-Saharan Africa to adapt to the impacts of climate change since 2010. It is based on evidence and practical experience in implementing community based adaptation (CBA), about gender dynamics and the ways in which CBA can increase adaptive capacity and promote gender equality.

Overview

Recommendations for policy and practice:

  • Tackle the gender dimensions of livelihoods: they are context-specific and addressing them in appropriate ways demands context-specific action. Gender-sensitive analysis, policy and planning is critical to this.
  • Include gender equality in climate change policy goals and strategies.
  • National and sub-national adaptation planning needs to be led by affected communities, and be based on an understanding of the gendered nature of climate change impacts as well as adaptation initiatives themselves so as not to further entrench inequality. Gender-equitable participatory actions will bring more gender balance into initiatives.
  • Some of the fundamental challenges women face cannot be resolved through a single CBA programme. Action is needed by other organisations and across government departments and through advocacy to address the entrenched drivers of gender inequality and poverty.
  • Strengthen interdepartmental work between women’s departments and climate change departments.
  • Close the gap between policy and implementation where adequate policies do exist that focus on addressing gender equality.
  • Power imbalance and access to decision-making in the home, community and country must be recognised and addressed in the global response.
  • Approach efforts to address adaptive capacity and gender equality not as an issue for women alone, but as an issue that is critical for the advancement of everyone in society; it is an indispensable part of achieving social justice.
  • Invest in context-specific analysis as it is critical to understand the interconnected factors shaping adaptive capacity in order to design effective and appropriate adaptation action.
  • Invest in improving women’s economic empowerment in the face of climate change to address the way resources and labour are distributed and valued in the economy.
  • Programmes need appropriate timeframes and adequate resources in order to influence social change.
  • CBA programme designs should be required to produce gender disaggregated monitoring and to establish monitoring and evaluation of changes in gender dynamics.
  • Investing in understanding and measuring the gendered impacts of climate change beyond economic loss is important for making all types of loss and damage visible and to ensure it is accounted for, so as to build an evidence base of the human impact of climate change.

Usage: Guideline for implementation

Audience: Staff and Practitioners

Reference: Care, Gender dynamics in a changing climate: how gender and adaptive capacity affect resilience. accessible from: http://careclimatechange.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Gender-and-Adaptation-Learning-Brief.pdf [last accessed 28 Sept 2016]

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Understanding Gender in Community-based Adaptation. Practitioner Brief 3

Understanding Gender in Community-based Adaptation. Practitioner Brief 3

Purpose: 

The brief documents the learning on community based adaptation approaches in ways that are useful to practitioners and decision-makers, in an effort to create an enabling environment for community-based adaptation and to promote good practice by adaptation and development actors.

Doing climate change adaptation in a community-based way is about grounding the process in a good understanding of the local social make-up, and putting the decision-making power into the hands of those affected by the climatic changes.

Integrating gender into community-based adaptation:

  • Is essential for practitioners and communities to ground the adaptation process in a good understanding of the context, existing vulnerabilities and capacities.
  • Is essential for communities to ensure the processes and actions they choose are relevant to both men and women in different social settings.
  • Helps practitioners and communities understand why and how gender groups can be vulnerable to climate change in different ways, and how this changes over time.
  • Helps to ensure decision-making power is more equally distributed between different social groups affected by climatic changes.
  • Is required for community-based adaptation to contribute to the transformation of long-standing, deeply rooted barriers to development.

 

Overview:

The brief contains explanations on:

  • Community-based adaptation: why gender matters
  • Integrating gender analysis in community-based adaptation: How does it work?
  • Practical steps for integrating gender analysis into community-based adaptation, involving:  identifying the purpose and questions, choosing the tools, getting the information, analysis and identifying strategic gender issues.

Usage: Guideline for implementation

Audiences: Practitioners, staff

Reference: Care International. Understanding gender in community-based adaptation. Practitioner Brief 3. Adaptation Learning Program for Africa, pp. 1-23. Accessible from http://careclimatechange.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/CBA-and-Gender-Analysis-Brief.pdf [last accessed 28 Sept 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.03
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

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IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH)

IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH)

Purpose

Why does gender equality matter in emergency Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) interventions? This document addresses this issue as well as the steps involved in providing emergency WASH programming.

Overview

The steps involved in providing emergency WASH programming that is effective, safe and restores dignity include: a needs assessment; activities and outcomes. A needs assessment is the essential first step. A gender analysis is also critical to understanding the social and gender dynamics that could help or hinder aid effectiveness. The gender analysis in the needs assessment will identify gender gaps such as unequal access to WASH services for women/girls and men/boys that need to be addressed. These should be integrated into activities. The project’s outcomes should capture the change that is expected for female and male beneficiaries.

Actions that can be used when designing or vetting a gender integrated project, and that can be a useful reference in designing minimum gender commitments include: analysing the impact of the crisis on women, men, boys and girls and what this entails in terms of division of tasks/labour, workload and access to WASH services; taking specific action to prevent risks of GBV, consulting girls and women at all stages of the WASH project, particularly about the location and the design of water points, showers and toilets in order to reduce time spent waiting and collecting water and to mitigate incidences of violence; ensuring that evaluation and translation teams include female staff; ensuring women, men, boys and girls participate equally in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian WASH response; ensuring women, men, boys and girls can access WASH services equally; and, based on gender analysis, making sure that women, girls, boys and men are targeted with specific actions when appropriate.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) (September 2012). IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) (pp. 1-2). Available from: http://reliefweb.int/report/world/iasc-gender-marker-tip-sheet-water-sanitation-hygiene-wash [Accessed: 31 December 2015].

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Author: IASC
Publication date: September 1, 2012
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.296
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework

Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework

Purpose

In October 2013, White Ribbon began coordinating a National Community of Practice composed of organisations with projects funded by Status of Women Canada’s ‘Working Together: Engaging Communities To End Violence Against Women And Girls’. The Community of Practice focused on sharing lessons learned, challenges and enabling factors in engaging men and boys to help prevent gender-based violence.

One of the three main activities was the development of a National Evaluation Framework (NEF) to identify shared results across programmes and provide an evaluation resource tool for others in the gender-based violence prevention sector.

Overview

The process of change involved in engaging men and boys in GBV prevention includes three main elements: the context, the outcomes as they relate to the dimensions of change and the longer-term objective of sustainability (p. 10).

NEF measures change at four levels: the community, organisational, social and individual level.

In order to create sustainable change, capacity needs to be built at four levels: with individual men and boys; within male networks and relationships; the organisations that are committed to doing this work; and the community’s capacity to respond to and support GBV prevention initiatives.

Expected outcomes from the NEF include: awareness-raising; knowledge and understanding; attitudinal change; skill development; behavioural change; gender equitable peer interaction and support; partnerships and coalition building; advocacy for gender-based violence prevention.

Usage: Policy guidance

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: National Community of Practice & White Ribbon Canada (2015). Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework (pp. 1-20). Available at: http://whiteribbon.ca/pdfs/NEF_CoP.pdf [Accessed 8 January]

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Author: White Ribbon
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.847
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Purpose

This publication aims to shed some light on women’s capabilities to take leading roles in building disaster resilience. It features women as drivers of change in different socio-economic contexts, and under various gender conditions.

The publication includes case studies from 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Oceania. For each case study it looks at the initiative, its impact and results, the good practices, lessons learned and potential for replication.

Overview

  • Based on the success of the Girls in Risk Reduction Leadership (GIRRL) Project of the African Centre for Disaster Studies (ACDS), a project is under way in Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe, adapting GIRRL to local contexts. Trained as leaders and resource persons, participating school girls have gained better social status and taken up leadership roles, serving as key Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) informants. The girls also identified potential hazards and encouraged DRR measures. Through them, gender equity is introduced into DRR work.
  • Following the Black Saturday bushfires in Australia on Saturday 7 February 2009, research was conducted to throw some light on what actually happens to women during a disaster and its aftermath in Australia. Based on its findings, a series of women-led actions and events took place, leading to many Australian ‘firsts’, of which the creation of Australia’s first Gender & Disaster Taskforce, a key body for advancing gender and disaster issues in Victoria.
  • Some remote coastal villages in southern Bangladesh are not yet reached by the country’s national disaster management system. In light of the above, Action Against Hunger (ACF) implemented a Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) pilot project in 10 villages, establishing a Village Disaster Management Committee (VDMC) and a Women’s Committee (WC) in each of them. When a tropical storm struck, shortly after the end of the project, the women put in practice the disaster preparedness measures that had been explained to them. They protected their lives and livelihoods, on their own initiative, without the intervention of the national disaster management system.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015). Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned (pp. 1-96). Available from: http://www.unisdr.org/files/42882_42882womensleadershipinriskresilien.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015].

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Author: UN
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2
Country: Regional
Resource type: Case study

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Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Purpose

This document looks at the impact achieved by a UN Women programme that strengthens the role women play in disaster-risk reduction and disaster-reduction management in Vietnam.

Overview

  • Prior to the project, there were few women on the Committees for Flood and Storm Control (CFSC). Through the training of women in disaster management, as well as national lobbying – supported by UN Women, UNDP and other stakeholders – the contribution of women has been recognised. A government decree, issued in September 2013, provides an official space for the Women’s Union in decision-making boards of the CFSC at all levels.
  • Beneficiaries stated that due to good preparation and the detailed mapping that was developed in meetings before each storm, nobody in the village was killed or injured severely in the last storm season. They also discussed at meetings how to encourage people to harvest earlier before the storm season started.
  • A four-year-old boy was saved from drowning because his mother performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on him. She and another 120 women and girls learned this life-saving technique from the rescue and first aid training provided by the project.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: UN Women (2014). Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning. Impact Story (pp. 1-2). Available from: http://www.unwomen.org/~/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/library/publications/2014/un%20women_vietnam_us_web.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Author: UN Women
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.367
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Case study

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Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Purpose

This guide gives suggestions on how to address gender and women’s empowerment in climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR) projects, or projects which have integrated climate change and DRR considerations.

Overview

Three steps are involved in conducting a gender analysis:

  • Analyse the broader context: This includes exploring gender and sex-disaggregated secondary data; mapping policies and laws related to human rights and gender policies, and commitments and implementation of Conventions such as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW); investigating wider cultural norms, values and practices related to gender (for example, expectations of how individuals should act, or customs related to marriage).
  • Select and investigate key areas: investigating key areas related to the type of intervention being designed or implemented; exploring these areas through review of secondary data and exercises with participants and stakeholders; paying attention to the individual, relational and structural levels.
  • Prioritise practical and strategic gender issues: identifying practical issues which involve addressing immediate gender issues and needs, such as providing financial training for women business owners so that they may improve their income. Practical needs should be addressed in order to ensure the equal and sustainable impact of projects. It is also important to identify strategic factors, such as laws or social norms, which must be tackled in order to transform unequal gender relations in the long-term. If strategic factors are ignored, practical solutions are likely to have minimal sustainable impact.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Coulier, M. & Konstantinidis, D. (June 2015). Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide. Care International in Vietnam (pp. 1-101). Available from: http://careclimatechange.org/tool-kits/making-it-count-integrating-gender/ [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Purpose

This training manual seeks to fill gaps in practical guidance in gender mainstreaming in disaster risk management at local and community level. It aims to strengthen participants’ knowledge and skills in integrating gender in the concepts and practices of Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM).

In general, the training aims to integrate gender perspective in disaster risk management to ensure that both women and men have the necessary capacities in addressing their respective vulnerabilities to enable them to protect themselves, their families and their immediate communities.

Overview

The training curriculum is divided into five modules. For each module it details the purpose of the learning objectives, key points, methodology, process and materials needed for the training. It also gives an estimated duration for the module.

  • Understanding Disasters and Community-Based Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at local disaster experiences, basic concepts, disaster and community-based disaster risk management. Pages 40-43 look at gender and gender-sensitive disaster risk management.
  • Gender Perspective in CBDRM: This module looks at the need for gender-sensitive CBDRM and how to integrate the gender perspective in CBDRM.
  • Gender-Sensitive Risk Assessment: This module looks at hazard assessment, participatory vulnerability and capacity assessment and gender-sensitive community risk assessment hands-on. Pages 85-87 look at how gender relations shape the four factors of vulnerability: economic, social, physical and environmental. A checklist for gender-sensitive risk assessment can be found on pp. 104-105.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at gender-sensitive disaster risk reduction and emergency response and recovery.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management Planning: This module looks at gender-sensitive CBDRM planning (action planning). A framework for using gender equality and women’s empowerment can be found on p. 153.

Usage: Training

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Technical staff

Reference: Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (2010). Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual (pp. 1-174). Available from: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/14452_genderincbdrm1.pdf [Accessed: 22 December 2015].

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Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit – Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014

Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit – Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014

Purpose

This document provides a review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers (ECV) Manual and Toolkit and its rollout in Asia Pacific. It includes case studies on the use of the toolkit in a number of countries in Asia Pacific.

Overview

  • The evaluation found the original English text to be clear and simple to understand, although there was some duplication between sections of sessions 2 and 3, especially in relation to the roles and expectations of volunteers. Graphics and drawings required contextualisation. National Societies were advised to adapt illustrations to their own settings.
  • The original ECV toolkit and manual covers 17 of the most common diseases occurring during epidemics. There are some diseases with epidemic potential that are not included in the toolkit. Some National Societies decided to include additional diseases after consultation with their national health authorities. The addition required a significantly higher degree of work compared with those disease pages that required translation and adaptation only. In some cases, the addition of new diseases to the tool delayed the whole production process.
  • The rollout of the toolkit was highly relevant and effective in meeting countries’ needs, epidemic priorities and in the contexts of the community programmes. The strategy of sensitising the leadership of National Societies and relevant national authorities as the first step has proven to be highly effective in beginning the rollout of ECV as this helped pave the way for mainstreaming it into National Societies’ health programmes or those of national authorities, as well as emergency contingency planning. The approach of mainstreaming and integration into existing health or disaster management programmes was also widely recognised as appropriate to ensure sustainability and optimal use of resources.
  • Recommendations from the evaluation include: keeping it simple; keeping it flexible; the need for National Societies to consider the toolkit as their tool, not an IFRC programme; keeping the training timeframe adaptable; considering additional options – online training, (and, for example, offline CDs); improving advocacy and the dissemination of the materials.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2015). Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit. Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014. (pp. 1-72).

See related document: Epidemic Control for Volunteers: A Training Manual

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.7
Country: Regional
Resource type: Research

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