Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Purpose:

The framework aims to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries over the next 15 years.

The framework applies to the risk of small-scale and large-scale, frequent and infrequent, sudden and slow-onset disasters, caused by natural or manmade hazards as well as related environmental, technological and biological hazards and risks. It aims to guide the multi-hazard management of disaster risk in development at all levels as well as within and across all sectors.

Overview:

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 outlines seven clear targets and four priorities for action to prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks: (i) Understanding disaster risk; (ii) Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; (iii) Investing in disaster reduction for resilience and; (iv) Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.

The Framework was adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan, on March 18, 2015.

Usage: Policy reference

See also: Chart of the Framework A3 | Chart of the Framework (simplified) A4

Sendai Framework Chart

Sendai Framework Chart

Sendai Framework simplified chart

Sendai Framework simplified chart

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Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Purpose

This publication aims to shed some light on women’s capabilities to take leading roles in building disaster resilience. It features women as drivers of change in different socio-economic contexts, and under various gender conditions.

The publication includes case studies from 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Oceania. For each case study it looks at the initiative, its impact and results, the good practices, lessons learned and potential for replication.

Overview

  • Based on the success of the Girls in Risk Reduction Leadership (GIRRL) Project of the African Centre for Disaster Studies (ACDS), a project is under way in Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe, adapting GIRRL to local contexts. Trained as leaders and resource persons, participating school girls have gained better social status and taken up leadership roles, serving as key Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) informants. The girls also identified potential hazards and encouraged DRR measures. Through them, gender equity is introduced into DRR work.
  • Following the Black Saturday bushfires in Australia on Saturday 7 February 2009, research was conducted to throw some light on what actually happens to women during a disaster and its aftermath in Australia. Based on its findings, a series of women-led actions and events took place, leading to many Australian ‘firsts’, of which the creation of Australia’s first Gender & Disaster Taskforce, a key body for advancing gender and disaster issues in Victoria.
  • Some remote coastal villages in southern Bangladesh are not yet reached by the country’s national disaster management system. In light of the above, Action Against Hunger (ACF) implemented a Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) pilot project in 10 villages, establishing a Village Disaster Management Committee (VDMC) and a Women’s Committee (WC) in each of them. When a tropical storm struck, shortly after the end of the project, the women put in practice the disaster preparedness measures that had been explained to them. They protected their lives and livelihoods, on their own initiative, without the intervention of the national disaster management system.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015). Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned (pp. 1-96). Available from: http://www.unisdr.org/files/42882_42882womensleadershipinriskresilien.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015].

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Document Data

Author: UN
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2
Country: Regional
Resource type: Case study

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Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Purpose

This document looks at the impact achieved by a UN Women programme that strengthens the role women play in disaster-risk reduction and disaster-reduction management in Vietnam.

Overview

  • Prior to the project, there were few women on the Committees for Flood and Storm Control (CFSC). Through the training of women in disaster management, as well as national lobbying – supported by UN Women, UNDP and other stakeholders – the contribution of women has been recognised. A government decree, issued in September 2013, provides an official space for the Women’s Union in decision-making boards of the CFSC at all levels.
  • Beneficiaries stated that due to good preparation and the detailed mapping that was developed in meetings before each storm, nobody in the village was killed or injured severely in the last storm season. They also discussed at meetings how to encourage people to harvest earlier before the storm season started.
  • A four-year-old boy was saved from drowning because his mother performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on him. She and another 120 women and girls learned this life-saving technique from the rescue and first aid training provided by the project.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: UN Women (2014). Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning. Impact Story (pp. 1-2). Available from: http://www.unwomen.org/~/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/library/publications/2014/un%20women_vietnam_us_web.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Author: UN Women
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.367
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Case study

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Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Purpose

This training manual seeks to fill gaps in practical guidance in gender mainstreaming in disaster risk management at local and community level. It aims to strengthen participants’ knowledge and skills in integrating gender in the concepts and practices of Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM).

In general, the training aims to integrate gender perspective in disaster risk management to ensure that both women and men have the necessary capacities in addressing their respective vulnerabilities to enable them to protect themselves, their families and their immediate communities.

Overview

The training curriculum is divided into five modules. For each module it details the purpose of the learning objectives, key points, methodology, process and materials needed for the training. It also gives an estimated duration for the module.

  • Understanding Disasters and Community-Based Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at local disaster experiences, basic concepts, disaster and community-based disaster risk management. Pages 40-43 look at gender and gender-sensitive disaster risk management.
  • Gender Perspective in CBDRM: This module looks at the need for gender-sensitive CBDRM and how to integrate the gender perspective in CBDRM.
  • Gender-Sensitive Risk Assessment: This module looks at hazard assessment, participatory vulnerability and capacity assessment and gender-sensitive community risk assessment hands-on. Pages 85-87 look at how gender relations shape the four factors of vulnerability: economic, social, physical and environmental. A checklist for gender-sensitive risk assessment can be found on pp. 104-105.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at gender-sensitive disaster risk reduction and emergency response and recovery.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management Planning: This module looks at gender-sensitive CBDRM planning (action planning). A framework for using gender equality and women’s empowerment can be found on p. 153.

Usage: Training

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Technical staff

Reference: Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (2010). Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual (pp. 1-174). Available from: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/14452_genderincbdrm1.pdf [Accessed: 22 December 2015].

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Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1

Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1

Purpose

This document provides case studies of initiatives that have been taken in Asia to promote equal treatment of all in society before, during and after disasters.

Overview

The document provides an overview of the following case studies: a disaster risk reduction (DRR) gender checklist prepared to ensure the implementation of gender inclusive and responsive DRR in the Philippines; women-friendly spaces set up in Pakistan in the aftermath of floods that hit Pakistan in 2010. These centres provide safe spaces for women affected by gender-based violence, providing psychosocial support as well as opportunities to participate in local support groups and receive information about gender-based violence; and promoting gender equality in disaster response in Nepal after the earthquake in 2015.

Page 6 contains a gender emergency checklist for Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Technical staff, Volunteers

Reference: OCHA (2015). Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1 (pp. 1-8). Available from: http://www.adpc.net/igo/category/ID991/doc/2015-vAQd72-ADPC-Integrating_Gender_into_Humanitarian_Action_1.pdf [Accessed: 21 December 2015].

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Health impacts of climate change: Adaptation strategies for Western Australia – Department of Health, Australia

Health impacts of climate change: Adaptation strategies for Western Australia – Department of Health, Australia

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.782
Country: Regional
Theme(s): Climate change
Resource type: Report, Research

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The Role of Social Capital in Strengthening Disaster Resilience in Thailand

The Role of Social Capital in Strengthening Disaster Resilience in Thailand

Purpose

This study aims contribute to the existing evidence base on how social capital can be harnessed to strengthen disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Thailand. While social capital is generally recognised as an important means to building community resilience, there is still little knowledge about how it can be best utilised towards DRR efforts. The study is based on a literature review and field work carried out in three communities in Thailand.

Overview

  • The study finds that, despite the attachment and harmony that people feel towards their community, levels of social trust are low. This has implications not only for Thai communities’ abilities to respond to, and cope with, disasters, but also in their abilities to prosper and thrive as a nation.
  • Thai communities are built on strong family ties and on strong bonds with friends and neighbours. It is a society of very strong immediate networks, in that very few people lack a support network. However, this means that, for the minority that do lack social capital, life can be extremely difficult. As such, investments in social capital must ensure that they are broad-based and inclusive, with a focus on integrating marginalised populations, such as undocumented migrant communities or political and religious minorities.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.5
Country: Thailand
Resource type: Research

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The road to resilience – Bridging relief and development for a more sustainable future, IFRC discussion paper on resilience 2012

The road to resilience – Bridging relief and development for a more sustainable future, IFRC discussion paper on resilience 2012

Purpose:

The purpose of this document is to present key partners with the IFRC’s definition of, and perspectives on, resilience. It includes case studies from America, Asia and Africa.

Overview:

  • For the IFRC, resilience is defined as the ability of individuals, communities, organisations, or countries exposed to disasters and crises and underlying vulnerabilities to anticipate, reduce the impact of, cope with, and recover from the effects of adversity without compromising their long-term.
  • Interventions to strengthen resilience aim to: (a) address underlying causes of vulnerability in order to protect development; (b) reduce and mitigate radical drops in resilience caused by disasters and crises; and (c) enhance bouncing back from adversity.
  • To strengthen resilience there is a need to accept that people come first. Resilience is not something outsiders can do, or bring to individuals or communities; one must respect local ownership. Dependency on outside support or substitution should be avoided as much as possible. It is also necessary to engage in comprehensive cross-sector assessments, planning and implementation, and to develop a long-term perspective. Strengthening resilience does not happen overnight and requires long-term engagement and investment; working in partnership; knowing the limits; and strengthening disaster laws and policies.
  • Characteristics of a resilient community, with case studies, can be found on pp. 17-25.

 

Usage:Guidance for project implementation

Audience: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date: June 1, 2012
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.6
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Integrating Climate Change and Urban Risks into the VCA – Ensure effective participatory analysis and enhanced community action (2014)

Integrating Climate Change and Urban Risks into the VCA – Ensure effective participatory analysis and enhanced community action (2014)

Purpose

The guidelines in this document have been developed to specifically address two key recommendations that have emerged from the vulnerability and capacity assessment (VCA) review. They are to provide further guidance to national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies on how to: i) integrate information on the additional risks and vulnerabilities linked to climate change into the existing VCA process and tools; ii) ensure that relevant information is included on what needs to be done differently when conducting a VCA in an urban context, and on using the existing VCA tools.

Overview

  • Climate change issues need to be reinforced in the VCA to ensure that additional risks (present and future) caused by a changing climate will be included in long-term risk and vulnerability-reduction strategies. A box on how to address some of the impacts of climate change in VCA can be found on pp. 34-37.
  • On p. 43 a figure illustrates the 12 steps involved in VCA. While climate change needs to be considered throughout, it uses arrows to show the steps whereby the VCA team will need to think about, or do, things slightly differently to ensure that the added risks brought by climate change are properly addressed.
  • VCA can be applied in urban areas. This requires adapting the tools but not changing the VCA methodology. When carrying out VCA in urban areas, fundamental social and physical differences between rural and urban locations need to be taken into account.
  • On p. 60 a figure illustrates the 12 steps involved in VCA and uses arrows to illustrate key points when additional attention to the urban context will need to be given by the National Society and the VCA team

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.63
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Purpose

This document is an evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA) being carried out in 20 communes in Vietnam. The evaluation focuses on how VCA is managed to include vulnerable groups such as people with disability (PWD), the elderly, women and children, and how VCA can be adjusted to developments such as climate change adaptation and urbanisation. It also looks at the effectiveness of the VCA for local disaster risk reduction planning.

The study also looks into the differences and comparative advantages and disadvantages of CBDRA with the objective of informing the implementation by the Vietnam Red Cross Society (VNRC) of its own VCA, and its supporting role to the government CBDRA.

Overview

  • The evaluation shows that VNRC’s VCA capacity is in need of maintenance. To ensure that the VCAs have a meaningful contribution to effective local community risk reduction planning, the following areas need attention: meaningful inclusion of vulnerable groups through better facilitation; better data analysis and reporting; and follow-up on VCA results at different levels. In addition, VNRC needs a better system to maintain and develop its pool of trainers.
  • VNRC should recognise that, even if it decided to adopt the CBDRA, it would likely keep a core position in community assessments in Vietnam, as its support would be indispensable to the Vietnamese government in implementing the CBDRA.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

For Vietnamese version, click here Tiếng Việt, size 3 MB.

Citation: Hoa, N. T. P. & Miltenburg, M. (October 2015). Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA). International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-109).

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