Monitoring Tool for Disability Inclusion

Monitoring Tool for Disability Inclusion

Purpose:

This tool is designed by the ICRC to give a quick indication of how their teams engage with disability inclusion. It is not meant in any way to be judgmental or focus on what is not achieved, rather it is meant to highlight a few key issues around inclusion and also help us find ways forward to promote inclusion if the need is felt to be valuable by participants. The tool helps them to focus their interviews with each team, and also help them note progress made over the year.

Overview:

The monitoring tool is built around the aspects of strategy, international frameworks, human resources, accessibility, partnerships, projects, budget allocation, planing, monitoring and evaluation.

 

Usage: Self assessment

Audience: National Society Headquarter and Branches

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Author: ICRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Word Size (MB): Size: 0.1
Country: Global
Resource type: Checklist

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Disability-inclusive Sustainable Development Goals

Disability-inclusive Sustainable Development Goals

Purpose and overview:

The poster highlights how disability is included in 5 Sustainable Development Goals number 4, 8, 10, 11 and 17.

Usage: Awareness raising

Audience: National Society gender and diversity practitioners

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Document Data

Author: UNISDR
Publication date: January 1, 2016
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.48
Country: Global
Resource type: Brochure, Poster

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Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development

Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development

Purpose

This practice note seeks to contribute to a conversation on how data on disability can be collected and used within programmes to support both inclusive development practice and inclusive development outcomes.

It starts by providing a brief overview of disability inclusive development practice and the need for data to support this. It then outlines some key issues and principles to consider when collecting disability inclusive data; how such information can be used to strengthen disability inclusion at all stages of the project and programme cycle; and methods and tools that can be used to gather data from adults and children with disabilities.

Overview

Applying the principles of disability inclusive development practice to data collection not only requires collection of data on the specific situation of people with disabilities, but also the inclusion of people with disabilities in all data collection processes that concern them.

A table on collecting and using information about disability throughout the project cycle can be found on p. 17.

Data collection methods and approaches that can be used to support disability inclusive practice include: disaggregating data by disability; specific tools to support disaggregation of data relating to disability, including the Washington Group Short Set of Questions and Rapid Assessment of Disability; surveys, key informant interviews, focus groups, story collecting and participatory learning and action to collect data inclusive of people with disabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Bush, A. & James, K. (July 2015). Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development. Plan International Australia, CBM Australia- Nossal Institute Partnership for Disability Inclusive Development (pp. 1-33). Available from: http://www.addc.org.au/documents/resources/plan-cbm-nossal_disability-data-collection-practice-note_july2015_1607.pdf [Accessed: 26 December 2015].

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.431
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

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Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Purpose

This document is an evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA) being carried out in 20 communes in Vietnam. The evaluation focuses on how VCA is managed to include vulnerable groups such as people with disability (PWD), the elderly, women and children, and how VCA can be adjusted to developments such as climate change adaptation and urbanisation. It also looks at the effectiveness of the VCA for local disaster risk reduction planning.

The study also looks into the differences and comparative advantages and disadvantages of CBDRA with the objective of informing the implementation by the Vietnam Red Cross Society (VNRC) of its own VCA, and its supporting role to the government CBDRA.

Overview

  • The evaluation shows that VNRC’s VCA capacity is in need of maintenance. To ensure that the VCAs have a meaningful contribution to effective local community risk reduction planning, the following areas need attention: meaningful inclusion of vulnerable groups through better facilitation; better data analysis and reporting; and follow-up on VCA results at different levels. In addition, VNRC needs a better system to maintain and develop its pool of trainers.
  • VNRC should recognise that, even if it decided to adopt the CBDRA, it would likely keep a core position in community assessments in Vietnam, as its support would be indispensable to the Vietnamese government in implementing the CBDRA.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

For Vietnamese version, click here Tiếng Việt, size 3 MB.

Citation: Hoa, N. T. P. & Miltenburg, M. (October 2015). Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA). International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-109).

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Audio Visual: Qualified for Work, Resilient for Life

Audio Visual: Qualified for Work, Resilient for Life

Purpose

In October 2010, the VNRC started implementing a four-year project in two phases, supporting the socio-economic inclusion and employment for People with Disabilities (PwD) in six provinces of Vietnam. SRC provided technical and financial support. The overall objective of the project was to reduce the vulnerability of PwD in Vietnam.

This video looks at the types of support given to individuals, and the stages involved in the project.

Overview

  • The programme provided the opportunity for participants to be placed in various enterprises to receive training. In addition to the training for PwD, the VNRC and SRC provide capacity-building and training to enhance VNRC staff and company owners’ competences to successfully manage vocational training.
  • The stages of the project are: 1) market survey and baseline; 2) project dissemination; 3) participants’ selection; 4) job orientation; 5) vocational training; 6) pre-employment training; 7) working for a company or training on how to “Start Your Own Business (SYOB)”.
  • So far, more than 100 people living with disabilities in six provinces of Vietnam have been provided with vocational training, job mediation and support to bring them more into mainstream society.

Usage: Learning from experience, Training

Audiences: Technical staff

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNEdDj1_1lk

Limitation: The video is not in English

Reference: Viet Nam Red Cross, Spanish Red Cross. (2013). Integracion de Personas con Discapacidad en Vietnam (translated to ‘Qualified for Work, Resilient for Life‘). Duration: 20.29 minutes [Online] Available from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNEdDj1_1lk [Accessed: 24th September 2015].

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 269
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Awareness materials, Video

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Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practice in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts in Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • The capacity-building process involves communities identifying their needs, volunteers offering their time, staff coordinating resources, and domestic and international partners providing support where necessary. It ultimately helps the vulnerable better manage their lives, reduce the risks they face and improve their long-term health, well-being and livelihoods.
  • In Mongolia the Red Cross strives to ensure that the voices of groups such as the elderly, disabled and women-headed households, which will usually not be heard, are included in planning and branch activities.
  • In Nepal, involvement with Red Cross programmes have improved the lives of Nepalese women, especially in terms of challenges faced by them in the community, which limit their participation in discussions about decisions affecting them.
  • Many Cambodians have experienced social isolation, exclusion or discrimination in different forms as victims of the AIDS virus, war or sexual assault. The Red Cross empowers such people as volunteers to achieve new and appreciated roles in their communities.
  • In Australia, the Red Cross has increased its attention to the needs of groups who have been marginalised socially, economically and culturally.

Usage: Training; Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Volunteers, youth, technical staff

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Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practices in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts from Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • To start a participatory planning process a local Red Cross/Red Crescent branch should organise a discussion with vulnerable groups. This should include local government and other organisations that can meet some of the needs of the people. From these discussions come ideas for services, offers for community help such as volunteers and locally raised funds. Once a programme is designed and implemented with community participation, the community should give regular feedback to the Red Cross/Red Crescent to ensure that the service meets their needs or to suggest how it could be improved.
  • In deciding its role to support the supply of clean drinking water, and other basic schemes, the Nepal Red Cross ensured that it closely consulted affected communities.
  • In Cambodia, where flood, drought, storm and fire are the most frequent natural disasters, the Red Cross uses participatory planning with communities affected by regular disasters to strengthen community capacities.
  • The Red Cross in Mongolia set up volunteer councils as a new way to listen to the needs of specific groups of people such as the youth, elderly and disabled.
  • In Australia the Red Cross decided to find ways to work with young people, to understand better their needs and vulnerabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Youth

The video could be accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bft-_gKvt8

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.63
Country: Global, Regional

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“I see that it is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings

“I see that it is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings

Purpose

This report documents the key findings and lessons learned from a project the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and the Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) conducted to identify the barriers that people with disabilities face in accessing programmes and services designed to prevent and respond to GBV, and to pilot and evaluate solutions for promoting disability inclusion in Gender-Based Violence (GBV) programmes in conflict-affected settings. It concludes with practical recommendations for a range of humanitarian actors, governments and donors to improve disability inclusion in GBV programming in humanitarian settings.

The project was conducted in conflict-affected communities in Burundi, Ethiopia, Jordan and the Northern Caucasus in the Russian Federation.

Overview

  • Negative attitudes and discrimination by GBV service providers, family and community members prevented access to GBV prevention activities and response services.
  • Inadequate transportation to activity locations and service centres, and lack of use of appropriate communication approaches by GBV practitioners, particularly for people who are deaf or with intellectual disabilities, also served as a barrier to access and participation.
  • Caregivers of persons with disabilities report being excluded from activities as a result of being unable to leave the people they care for.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Parts of this report: the full report, 2-pager summary and toolkit

Reference: Women’s Refugee Commission (May 2015). “I see that It Is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings. Pp.1-41. Available from: https://www.womensrefugeecommission.org/resources/document/945-building-capacity-for-disability-inclusion-in-gender-based-violence-gbv-programming-in-humanitarian-settings-overview [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.13
Country: Global, Regional

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All Under One Roof – Disability-Inclusive Shelter And Settlements in Emergencies

All Under One Roof – Disability-Inclusive Shelter And Settlements in Emergencies

Purpose

This document offers technical guidance for disability-inclusive shelter and settlement support in emergencies. Developed by IFRC, Handicap International and CBM, it draws upon guidelines from these and other institutions, relevant national and international standards, and the expertise of practitioners.

It aims to be a key reference for planning and implementation of shelter and settlements projects to ensure fully inclusive humanitarian action.

It includes case studies from the Caribbean, Asia and Africa.

Overview

Some barriers that prevent participation and equal opportunities for people with disabilities include physical, informational, organisational barriers and attitudes or stigma.  Pre-existing barriers can be compounded by crisis, while other barriers are created by an emergency and can result in new disabilities.

A checklist on preparedness can be found on pp. 36-37; emergency response, pp. 50-51; early recovery, pp. 64-65; standards for settlements, pp. 82-83; standards for shelter, pp. 98-99; emergency items distribution, pp. 112-113; inclusive beneficiary communications, pp. 130-131; and assisted self-settlement, p.139; and cash and vouchers for people with disabilities, pp. 152-153.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.21
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender and diversity for urban resilience: An analysis

Gender and diversity for urban resilience: An analysis

Purpose

This document looks at urban risk reduction: examples of gender and diversity-based risks and vulnerabilities in urban areas; social and economic inequalities to consider in urban environments; migrants; disability; and examples of gender and diversity vulnerabilities in urban disaster response and recovery.

The paper also looks at Gender-Based Violence (GBV) in terms of key issues of GBV during and after disasters, and key action points for addressing GBV in Disaster Risk Reduction/Disaster Management (DRR/DM).

Overview

  • Examples of gender and diversity-based risks and vulnerabilities in urban areas include: services and infrastructure; access to information; gender-based opportunities; and lack of support networks.
  • Social and economic inequalities to consider in urban environments include: greater social and economic inequalities; women taking on many roles in urban environments; women having less ownership over resources; and greater societal restrictions on women.
  • Examples of gender and diversity vulnerabilities in urban disaster response and recovery include: personal security; food insecurity; economic and livelihood insecurity; education; and migrant status.

 

Purpose: Knowledge building

Usage: Learning from experience, Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date: May 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.33
Country: Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

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