Innovative strategies using communications technologies to engage gay men and other men who have sex with men into early HIV testing and treatment in Thailand

Innovative strategies using communications technologies to engage gay men and other men who have sex with men into early HIV testing and treatment in Thailand

Purpose:

This document reviews the impact achieved by ‘Adam’s Love’, an integrated public–private sector web-based communications strategy launched by the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre in September 2011. Specific objectives of the strategy included scaling-up early HIV testing and treatment, increasing HIV-related awareness and knowledge, and positively influencing attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours about HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Thailand.

Overview:

Adam’s Love involves a website, social media and web message boards for online counselling, recruitment and appointment making; a club membership programme offering non-financial incentives for HTC; targeted marketing; and collaboration with MSM-friendly clinics and private hospitals to make HTC services more accessible.

Adam’s Love was able to recruit MSM that are at high risk of contracting HIV into HIV testing and counselling (HTC) services. Of the 1,181 MSM who accessed HTC services, almost half did not use condoms consistently and about one-fifth had between five and 20 sexual partners in the previous month. Through the programme, 16% of previously undiagnosed HIV cases were identified.

The majority of MSM recruited online into HTC services in the programme were young (half were 14–25 years old). Online recruitment was a channel to reach out to closet MSM as one-third (34%) were discreet about disclosing their gender identity.

Some evidence suggests that MSM who undergo HTC are likely to return for repeat testing. In fact, 66% of MSM who presented for HTC in the programme had planned to have HIV testing again in the next six months.

With internet-accessing behaviour shifting away from desktops, creating strategies targeting mobile and tablet users is essential.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audience: Communication staff , Health practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: Anand, T., Nitpolprasert, C., Ananworanich, J., Pakam, C., Nonenoy, S., Jantarapakde, J., & Phanuphak, N. (2015). Innovative Strategies Using Communications Technologies to Engage Gay Men and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men Into Early HIV Testing and Treatment in Thailand. Journal of Virus Eradication, 1 (pp. 111-115). Available from: bit.ly/1BR2RM1 [Accessed: 26 December 2015].

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Document Data

Author: Others
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.27
Country: Thailand
Resource type: Research

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HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

Purpose

This document provides guidelines to volunteers on the following issues: what is gender; gender and HIV; gender and HIV prevention; gender and HIV treatment; and the role of gender in care and support.

Overview

The purpose of session one is to ensure that community based volunteers (CBVs) are able to define gender and understand the role that gender plays in the lives of men, women, girls and boys in their community.

Session two seeks to understand how gender and HIV are related and explore how gender inequalities, gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) are linked to HIV.

Session three explores the ways in which gender influences the vulnerability of women, men, girls and boys to HIV infection/re-infection and the role of CBVs in providing information and support.

Session four builds knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of people to access, prepare for and adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the role of CBVs in providing gender-responsive support.

The purpose of session five is to provide participants with the knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of CBVs to provide care for others and to care for themselves.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Menstrual Hygiene Matters: A Resource for Improving Menstrual Hygiene Around the World

Menstrual Hygiene Matters: A Resource for Improving Menstrual Hygiene Around the World

Purpose

The purpose of this resource is to provide a comprehensive resource on menstrual hygiene that supports the development of context-specific information for improving practices for women and girls in lower- and middle-income countries. It includes a number of case studies from Asia and Africa.

Overview

The resource is divided into modules, each with its own toolkit, focusing on various aspects of menstrual hygiene. Each toolkit is organised as follows: checklists and other tools; technical designs and specifications; case studies, examples and further information; and bibliography.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Water Aid (2012). Menstrual Hygiene Matters: A Resource for Improving Menstrual Hygiene Around the World. Pp.2-252. Available from: http://www.wateraid.org/what-we-do/our-approach/research-and-publications/view-publication?id=02309d73-8e41-4d04-b2ef-6641f6616a4f [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

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Author: Water Aid
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 18.5
Country: Global
Resource type: Report, Research

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Audio Visual: What does every human being want?

Audio Visual: What does every human being want?

Purpose

“What does every human being want?” is an advocacy video describing the experience of children growing up with HIV. This video asks the question: What does every human being want? It shows that people living with HIV want acceptance and understanding just like any other human being.

Overview

The video shows that people living with HIV can work and be successful; lead happy lives and have their own families.  It shows the need to treat people living with HIV with the same love, care and affection one would show to other people because, in the end, it may not be the virus itself but the actions of people around them that will make them weak.

Usage: Learning from experience, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers

Limitation: Thai language with English subtitles

Reference: Audio visual: Thai Red Cross Society; Therapeutics, Research, Education and AIDS Training in Asia (TREAT Asia) (October 2015). What does every human being want? Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IC65IO9wMjM  [Accessed: 5 January 2016].

The video is in THAI, with:

For editable files, contact tarandeepsinghanand@gmail.com

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 33.2
Country: Regional, Thailand
Resource type: Awareness materials, Video

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Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Purpose

This note provides guidance on how to integrate gender and diversity considerations when applying the community-based health and first aid (CBHFA) approach, particularly in regard to health promotion and disease prevention, Mother, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH), non-communicable diseases (NCDs), violence prevention and urban health programmes.

It contains a number of case studies from Afghanistan, Honduras, Qatar and Ireland.

A checklist for designing gender and diversity-sensitive community health programmes can be found on p.17.

Overview

  • Most interventions related to MNCH and sexual and reproductive health focus primarily on improving women and adolescent girls’ knowledge of, and practices on, MNCH issues. However, in most societies, men often control household income and hold the decision-making powers in matters that affect MNCH. Interventions that aim to build communities’ resilience and achieve improvements in MNCH need to involve older people (men and women), religious leaders and more specifically men and boys given their familial and social roles within communities in order to improve MNCH outcomes.
  • The increase in and prevalence of NCDs represents a global health crisis. The inter-linkages between MNCH and the development of NCDs are becoming increasingly clear. NCDs are the leading cause of death among women worldwide, particularly during childbearing years. The four main NCD risk factors for women and men are: unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and excessive use of alcohol.
  • Violence is among the most prominent public health problems faced today. Besides being a leading cause of mortality, many of the millions of non-fatal injuries result in life-long disabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.73
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender and Disaster Management

Gender and Disaster Management

Purpose

This briefing paper looks at the importance of gender within Red Cross disaster management and offers some suggestions about how Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies might integrate gender into programmes and strategies.

Overview

Gender shapes the extent to which men, women, boys and girls are vulnerable to, and affected by, emergencies and disasters. It affects the kinds of responses that are feasible in different communities and societies. Understanding that men and women face different obstacles can help the development of more effective programmes and ensure that needs are met.

Programmes should include provision for gender-specific needs, including: appropriate clothing and hygiene supplies; safe transportation; childcare in relief centres; reproductive health services and anti-violence services.

Usage: Policy development , Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; National Society leadership; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Australian Red Cross. Gender and disaster management. Pp.1-8. Available from: http://www.redcross.org.au/gender-briefing-papers.aspx [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 8.12
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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