Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans

Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans

Purpose

This tip sheet presents key factors for effective reviewing, monitoring, and reporting on gender action plan implementation. It includes case studies from Lao and Nepal.

Overview

Key factors for effective monitoring and reporting include: routine collection of sex-disaggregated data for meaningful assessment of a project’s progress and gender equality results and outcomes; continuous dialogue, guidance, and supervision by resident mission (RM) and project gender specialists (GSs) for timely gender action plan (GAP) implementation; gender-inclusive project monitoring mechanisms such as the design and monitoring framework (DMF) to facilitate the monitoring, measuring, and reporting of gender-related targets, indicators, and results on men and women’s participation, access to project resources, benefits, and impacts; project Gender Action Plan (GAP) implementation monitoring matrix, identify obstacles and solutions to achievement of GAP targets, and summarise gender results in the project completion report; Gender capacity development for EAs/IAs on project- and sector-based gender issues organised by RM GSs on a regular basis to help project teams and directors improve GAP implementation, monitoring, and reporting; standardisation of project reporting to consolidate sector- and country-based gender results.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank (April 2013). Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans (pp. 1-4). Tip sheet No. 2. Available from: http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-no-4-project-reviews-monitoring-and-reporting-gender-action-plans [Accessed: 28 December 2015].

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Author: Others
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.436
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan

Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan

Purpose

This tip sheet shows how to prepare a project gender action plan and how this ensures gender-inclusive design and implementation of Asian Development Bank (ADB) projects.

The tip sheet provides an overview of what a Gender Action Plan (GAP) is, the importance of a GAP and what to watch out for when preparing one. It also provides key steps and tips to strengthen project design and good practices for developing effective project GAPs. It concludes with a good practice example of a sustainable rural infrastructure improvement project in Bangladesh.

Overview

Key steps in GAP preparation include:

  • Baseline data collection and setting targets: Without sex-disaggregated baseline data and gender analysis, it is not possible to identify realistic gender-based targets for the GAP and the design monitoring framework (DMF) that are relevant to overall project outcomes and outputs. In the absence of reliable national databases, developing project-specific baseline data is essential to understand the different roles, responsibilities, constraints, and needs of men and women in project areas for effective project design, progress monitoring, and impact evaluation.
  • Focusing gender analysis in project design on: access and control; access to and control of resources; decision-making power; need and priorities and institutional capacity.
  • Ownership of GAPs: To achieve gender-inclusive project results, project executing and implementing agencies need to fully understand and own GAPs. As a first step, detailed GAPs need to be developed jointly with project executing and implementing agencies using participatory approaches during the project inception phase, which will need to be followed by ongoing support, mentoring, and formal gender training during project implementation.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank (April 2013). Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan (pp. 1-4). Tip Sheet No. 2. Available from: http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-no-2-preparing-project-gender-action-plan [Accessed: 28 December 2015].

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Author: Others
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.391
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

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Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Purpose

This toolkit introduces the European Commission’s new Gender-Age Marker for humanitarian action. It provides an overview of the tool and its application, as well as guidance on how to integrate gender and age concerns in humanitarian action and on how to apply the marker to humanitarian projects.

Overview

The Gender-Age Marker uses four criteria to assess how strongly humanitarian actions integrate gender and age considerations: gender and age analysis / SADD; adapted assistance; negative effects; and adequate participation.

  • Chapter 1 on the operational importance of gender and age presents arguments and examples demonstrating that humanitarian aid is of higher quality and more effective if it integrates issues relating to gender and age.
  • Chapter 2 provides tip sheets on integrating gender and age in humanitarian actions to support humanitarian workers in making their actions more sensitive to gender and age issues.
  • Chapter 3 provides detailed guidance on how to use the Gender-Age Marker in humanitarian actions.
  • Chapter 4 provides guidance on how to deal with difficult cases when using the Gender-Age Marker. For instance what to do if: only one dimension (age or gender) is well reflected; another important diversity dimension is missing; the context makes it difficult to integrate gender and age; the partner has made progress but still does not meet the criteria; the action is heterogeneous; there are no potential negative effects; different age brackets are used to report beneficiary data.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Steets, J., Binder, A. & Foran, S. (2013). Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit. European Commission (pp. 1-83). Available from: http://ec.europa.eu/echo/files/policies/sectoral/gender_age_marker_toolkit.pdf [Accessed 8 January 2016].

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Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development

Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development

Purpose

This practice note seeks to contribute to a conversation on how data on disability can be collected and used within programmes to support both inclusive development practice and inclusive development outcomes.

It starts by providing a brief overview of disability inclusive development practice and the need for data to support this. It then outlines some key issues and principles to consider when collecting disability inclusive data; how such information can be used to strengthen disability inclusion at all stages of the project and programme cycle; and methods and tools that can be used to gather data from adults and children with disabilities.

Overview

Applying the principles of disability inclusive development practice to data collection not only requires collection of data on the specific situation of people with disabilities, but also the inclusion of people with disabilities in all data collection processes that concern them.

A table on collecting and using information about disability throughout the project cycle can be found on p. 17.

Data collection methods and approaches that can be used to support disability inclusive practice include: disaggregating data by disability; specific tools to support disaggregation of data relating to disability, including the Washington Group Short Set of Questions and Rapid Assessment of Disability; surveys, key informant interviews, focus groups, story collecting and participatory learning and action to collect data inclusive of people with disabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Bush, A. & James, K. (July 2015). Practice Note: Collecting and Using Data on Disability to Inform Inclusive Development. Plan International Australia, CBM Australia- Nossal Institute Partnership for Disability Inclusive Development (pp. 1-33). Available from: http://www.addc.org.au/documents/resources/plan-cbm-nossal_disability-data-collection-practice-note_july2015_1607.pdf [Accessed: 26 December 2015].

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Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

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Gender and diversity-sensitive approach to VCA tools

Gender and diversity-sensitive approach to VCA tools

 

Usage: Training

Audience: Gender and diversity practitioners, Communication staff, Volunteers

For Thai version, click here ภาษาไทย

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Author: IFRC
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Status: Final Type: Powerpoint Size (MB): Size: 0.67
Country: Regional
Resource type: Training materials

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Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Purpose

This study’s overall objective is to provide information on the collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD), and gender and generational analyses of SADD. It is intended to inform assessment processes by humanitarian actors responding to natural disasters and situations of armed conflict.

Overview

  • The document focuses on five clusters (education, emergency shelter, food security, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)). Within each cluster, it presents information from the published literature on how gender and age matter within these sectors for people living in crises caused by natural disaster and armed conflict. It then draws on interviews and published literature to examine if SADD is collected by UN lead cluster agencies, their partners and local agencies operating within these clusters and if so what, if any, difference it makes for programming.
  • Collection and use of SADD and gender and generational analyses enable operational agencies to deliver assistance more effectively and efficiently than without those data and findings, as illustrated by case studies and examples.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Dyan Mazurana, Prisca Benelli, Huma Gupta and Peter Walker, “Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies.” Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, August 2011.

 

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Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Purpose

This document outlines four criteria for assessing project/programme plans.  The criteria might not be applicable to projects that do not deal directly with populations affected by crisis or at risk.

Overview

The four criteria are:

  • Gender and diversity analysis and sex- and age-disaggregated data: how does the project take into consideration differences between girls, boys, women and men of different age groups in terms of their roles, responsibilities and control over resources, including their level of access to assistance; effects of the crisis or risk; capacities for coping with, responding to, recovering from and preparing for crises; and specific needs expectations and constraints?
  • Adapted assistance/services: what measures are taken to ensure that assistance and services provided by the project are accessible, affordable, acceptable and appropriate to gender and diversity concerns?
  • Negative effects: are potential negative effects of the project/programme on sex/age and diverse groups identified and prevented or mitigated?
  • Adequate participation of vulnerable and at-risk groups: how are sex/age and diverse groups consulted, informed and integrated in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project?

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Norwegian Red Cross (20 January 2015). Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3. Pp.2-69.  Available from: https://www.rodekors.no/Global/HK%20-%20Hovedkontoret/Internasjonal/Dokumenter/Gender/Final%20report,%20NorCross%20Gender%20Plan%20of%20Action%202009-2014.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Purpose

This briefing draws on 14 field projects to highlight common challenges of supporting older people. Eleven of the case studies summarise the key challenges and most effective responses that the experts identified during their visits. The three remaining case studies – from Darfur, the Occupied Palestinian Territories and Zimbabwe – draw on HelpAge’s own work in the field.

All the case studies demonstrate practical approaches that will help agencies increase the age-friendliness of their programming and make sure older people play an active role in their responses.

The overall aim of this good practice guide is to communicate ‘what works’, within a range of contexts, in order to promote protection initiatives for older people in emergencies that are truly inclusive.

Overview

  • This guide focuses on working practice in the following areas of humanitarian response: accessible shelter and latrines; livelihood support; access to food and accurate registration; strengthening family and community structures; better use of disaggregated data; appropriate healthcare; and mainstreaming age across clusters.
  • The examples of good practices shown in the guide have two key common elements: consultation with older people themselves and an appreciation that older people can play a vital role in developing and implementing their own solutions to the challenges they face.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (2012). Protecting older people in emergencies: good practice guide. Pp. 3-8. Available from: http://www.globalprotectioncluster.org/_assets/files/tools_and_guidance/age_gender_diversity/HelpAge_Older_People_Best_Practices_EN.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Purpose

This document provides an overview of tools required for gender analysis.

Overview

The tools are:

  • Sex-disaggregated data: For most gender assessments, separate data is needed for women and men. This is the foundation for the identification of societal differences between the sexes.
  • Gender impact assessment: This helps in identifying the impact of proposed measures on gender equality, and in countering any unintended effects on women or on men. It encourages gender equality in policy measures, improves the quality of the assessed policy as a whole and saves cost.
  • Gender equality audit: This helps to identify shortcomings, and strategies to overcome them. It also helps to motivate organisations to agree a set of gender equality targets and build gender-related capacity among staff.
  • Gender vulnerability assessment: Vulnerability should be assessed through the eyes of the vulnerable. Separate consultations with women may uncover gender-differentiated vulnerabilities and gender-sensitive adaptive responses.
  • Participatory methods: Actively strengthening participation of women and men in planning and public consultation is highly important. Very few policies are gender neutral.
  • Gender budgeting: The basic principle of gender budgeting is to connect two policy areas that used to be separated: gender inequality, and public finances and programmes.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Gender CC. (2012). Overview Tools for Gender Analysis. Pp.1-2. Available from:http://comm.gendercc.net/pluginfile.php/145/mod_resource/content/3/Table_Tools_for_Gender_Analysis.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: Gender CC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.50
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender-Inclusive Disaster Risk Management

Gender-Inclusive Disaster Risk Management

Purpose

This paper looks at key gender issues in disaster-risk management, gender-inclusive assessments, gender-design elements in strengthening disaster resilience, and gender-design elements in disaster recovery assistance. It includes case studies from Pakistan, Aceh in Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

Overview

  • Key gender issues include: disaster impacts are not gender-neutral; gender roles can change in disaster settings; gendered response can reduce long-term social consequences; and women as agents of change for disaster-risk reduction and strengthening resilience.
  • Features of a gender-inclusive assessment include: gender-differentiated target groups; sex-disaggregated data; data collectors representative of target population; culturally appropriate and participatory methodology; gender-sensitive training; and additional preparation.
  • Gender design elements in strengthening disaster resilience include: strengthening disaster resilience/gender-inclusive disaster resilience at the national level/community level; and capacity building and project management.
  • Gender design elements in disaster recovery assistance include: community infrastructure reconstruction; water supply and sanitation; housing reconstruction; livelihood restoration programmes; rural roads reconstruction; health service; and education.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank. (February 2014). Gender-inclusive disaster risk management. Pp. 1-12. Available from:http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-gender-inclusive-disaster-risk-management.  [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: ADB
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.38
Country: Global
Resource type: Briefing paper, Report, Research

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