Minimum Standards for Local Climate‐Smart Disaster Risk Reduction

Minimum Standards for Local Climate‐Smart Disaster Risk Reduction

Purpose

This document developed as a practical checklist to help local community leaders and disaster risk reduction (DRR) practitioners ensure their risk reduction efforts are climate‐smart and contribute to climate change adaptation. The minimum standards are presented in two tables. Each minimum standard is supported by practical ‘actions’ to guide implementation.

Overview

  • Table 1 outlines minimum standards for implementation of climate‐smart DRR activities at community level.
  • Table 2 outlines minimum standards for national and provincial civil society organisations (CSOs) – or relevant local government authorities – to support communities which implement climate‐smart DRR activities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.74
Country: Global, Regional

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A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Purpose:

This guide has been developed to support Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and IFRC staff in more systematically integrating risk reduction measures into their planning. It describes in detail what key issues need to be considered, and when. The guidance aims at ensuring that risk reduction measures are taken into account in different sectors and contexts. It also details the key elements that need to be in place to create an enabling environment.

Overview:

  • General steps for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) are: DRR and CCA screening. The strategy, policy, programme or project in question must be first screened with a DRR and CCA lens, and then a detailed assessment made. If this shows that disaster and climate change risks have not been duly considered or addressed, then adjustments should be made to the planned activity. A monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework should also be developed. Mainstreaming DRR and CCA can be ensured only when the process is regularly monitored and evaluated.
  • The paper details six specific programming contexts (conflict, urban, reducing vulnerability, strengthening resilience, disaster preparedness, disaster response, and recovery) and key sectors (health and care; water, sanitation and hygiene; migration; shelter and settlement; livelihood and food security; natural resource management) for mainstreaming DRR and CCA. Each of these is accompanied by specific key principles of DRR and CCA mainstreaming, as well as good practice checklists. Aside from the context-specific guidance, there are two general principles: first, a National Society needs to ensure that it has adequate capacity at relevant levels to mainstream DRR and CCA; second, given that risk patterns change, risk should be monitored at least once per year. If changes in circumstances and risk are identified, programming choices and activities may need to be adapted to these changes.
  • A gender good practice checklist can be found on p.52.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2013). A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (pp. 1-62).

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HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

Purpose

This document provides guidelines to volunteers on the following issues: what is gender; gender and HIV; gender and HIV prevention; gender and HIV treatment; and the role of gender in care and support.

Overview

The purpose of session one is to ensure that community based volunteers (CBVs) are able to define gender and understand the role that gender plays in the lives of men, women, girls and boys in their community.

Session two seeks to understand how gender and HIV are related and explore how gender inequalities, gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) are linked to HIV.

Session three explores the ways in which gender influences the vulnerability of women, men, girls and boys to HIV infection/re-infection and the role of CBVs in providing information and support.

Session four builds knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of people to access, prepare for and adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the role of CBVs in providing gender-responsive support.

The purpose of session five is to provide participants with the knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of CBVs to provide care for others and to care for themselves.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Purpose

This manual serves to equip the Canadian Red Cross team with the knowledge and tools to act as trainers for their partners and community-based organisations/associations/committees constituted as part of their programme.

The manual has six units which are to be treated as sessions. The lessons in each unit are sub-sessions, and where required each lesson is further divided into topics.

Overview

A trainer’s guide containing guidelines on how to deliver training can be found on p.6 of the document.

  • Unit 1 provides a broad overview of ageing at global and national levels and helps to get an insight into the need for mainstreaming age friendliness.
  • Unit 2 focuses on mobilising older people of the community.
  • Unit 3 lists a few means to understand the vulnerabilities of older people and also to tap into their capacities so that they can contribute to the overall welfare of the community.
  • Unit 4 provides a detailed overview of the different dynamics that affect older people in disasters.
  • Unit 5 focuses on the various dynamics associated with older women and older people with disabilities.
  • Unit 6 provides tools to assess age friendliness of a project, older people’s involvement in community based-organisations, capturing impact on older people, and tips to include older people in impact-monitoring and/or an evaluation process.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Canadian Red Cross, HelpAge International. Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia. . Pp. 1-96.

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Guidance on Including Older People in Emergency Shelter Programmes

Guidance on Including Older People in Emergency Shelter Programmes

Purpose

These guidelines recommend five key action points for including older people in shelter programmes.

Overview

Understand the needs and capacities of older people: programme staff must be aware of the importance of collecting data on older people. They should be aware of issues such as demographic change, international commitments, good practice and lessons learned from other projects on the vulnerabilities and contributions of older people.

Ensure that older people participate and are represented: an age-friendly shelter programme provides older people with choices about how to live, chances to participate in society, and the ability to live in a community where their needs can be addressed affordably.

Target vulnerable older people: focus on older men and women who are single, isolated or abandoned; are caring for children; are the main family breadwinners; living with chronic diseases, disability, or mobility or mental health problems; belong to the “oldest old” group; older widows; older men and women who rank as the poorest.

Incorporate age-friendly features in both household and community shelters: to build suitable shelters for older people, a blend of modern technology and traditional preferences is recommended. To ensure that the technical requirements are met, adhere to national and international standards for durable and environmentally-friendly shelter construction

Promote coordination, cooperation and sharing: to ensure that older people’s issues are not neglected or forgotten, it is crucial to include older people, along with other vulnerable groups, on the agenda of shelter cluster meetings.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

A two-page summary of these guidelines is also available at this link.

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Publication date: January 1, 2011
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.16
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender and Health in Disasters

Gender and Health in Disasters

Purpose

This document provides information on sex and gender differences in vulnerability to, and impact of, disasters. It looks at all levels of the disaster process: exposure to risk, risk perception, preparedness, response, physical impact, psychological impact, recovery and reconstruction.

Overview

  • There is some evidence showing that women and men may suffer different negative health consequences following a disaster. It is not clear whether this is because of biological differences between the sexes, because of socially determined differences in women’s and men’s roles and status or because of an interaction of social and biological factors.
  • Gender differences may exist in the perception of hazard risks. It has been suggested that women perceive disaster events or threats as more serious and risky than men do, especially if they threaten their family members.
  • The impact of disasters is felt differently within societies, and those most socially excluded and economically insecure bear a disproportionate burden. The impact of disasters also varies between women and men.
  • Emergency management agencies and others responsible for emergency relief such as law-enforcement agencies and fire personnel have historically been dominated by men. Male-dominated recovery groups which see disasters ‘through the eyes of men’ may organise relief work in a manner that does not take gender differences and women’s specific needs into consideration.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: World Health Organization (WHO), ( July 2002). Gender and Health in Disasters. Department of Gender and Women’s Health, Geneva, Switzerland. Pp1-4. Available at: http://www.who.int/gender/other_health/genderdisasters.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Author: WHO
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.73
Country: Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

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Gender and diversity for urban resilience: An analysis

Gender and diversity for urban resilience: An analysis

Purpose

This document looks at urban risk reduction: examples of gender and diversity-based risks and vulnerabilities in urban areas; social and economic inequalities to consider in urban environments; migrants; disability; and examples of gender and diversity vulnerabilities in urban disaster response and recovery.

The paper also looks at Gender-Based Violence (GBV) in terms of key issues of GBV during and after disasters, and key action points for addressing GBV in Disaster Risk Reduction/Disaster Management (DRR/DM).

Overview

  • Examples of gender and diversity-based risks and vulnerabilities in urban areas include: services and infrastructure; access to information; gender-based opportunities; and lack of support networks.
  • Social and economic inequalities to consider in urban environments include: greater social and economic inequalities; women taking on many roles in urban environments; women having less ownership over resources; and greater societal restrictions on women.
  • Examples of gender and diversity vulnerabilities in urban disaster response and recovery include: personal security; food insecurity; economic and livelihood insecurity; education; and migrant status.

 

Purpose: Knowledge building

Usage: Learning from experience, Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date: May 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.33
Country: Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

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Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Purpose

This document provides an overview of tools required for gender analysis.

Overview

The tools are:

  • Sex-disaggregated data: For most gender assessments, separate data is needed for women and men. This is the foundation for the identification of societal differences between the sexes.
  • Gender impact assessment: This helps in identifying the impact of proposed measures on gender equality, and in countering any unintended effects on women or on men. It encourages gender equality in policy measures, improves the quality of the assessed policy as a whole and saves cost.
  • Gender equality audit: This helps to identify shortcomings, and strategies to overcome them. It also helps to motivate organisations to agree a set of gender equality targets and build gender-related capacity among staff.
  • Gender vulnerability assessment: Vulnerability should be assessed through the eyes of the vulnerable. Separate consultations with women may uncover gender-differentiated vulnerabilities and gender-sensitive adaptive responses.
  • Participatory methods: Actively strengthening participation of women and men in planning and public consultation is highly important. Very few policies are gender neutral.
  • Gender budgeting: The basic principle of gender budgeting is to connect two policy areas that used to be separated: gender inequality, and public finances and programmes.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Gender CC. (2012). Overview Tools for Gender Analysis. Pp.1-2. Available from:http://comm.gendercc.net/pluginfile.php/145/mod_resource/content/3/Table_Tools_for_Gender_Analysis.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: Gender CC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.50
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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How to do a VCA: A Practical Step-by-Step guide for Red Cross Red Crescent Staff and Volunteers

How to do a VCA: A Practical Step-by-Step guide for Red Cross Red Crescent Staff and Volunteers

Purpose

The guidelines in this document aim to support National Societies in conducting Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and adapting the VCA process to their own countries. It provides a suggested path for conducting a VCA day-by-day in the field, and its expected outcomes.

Overview

The 12-step guide to effective VCA includes:

  • Level 1 – National Society support: understanding why VCA is being proposed; 2. sensitising National Society leadership, branches, and partners; 3. setting up a management structure for conducting VCA; 4. setting VCA objectives (such as where the assessments will take place).
  • Level 2 – from assessment to planning: planning the VCA (who will do what, how and when); 6. preparation; 7. using investigative tools within the community; 8. systematising, analysing and interpreting the data; 9. returning information to the community and deciding priorities and actions for transformation.
  • Level 3 – from planning to action: turning vulnerabilities into capacities through practical action; 11. recommendations and report-writing for local authorities, donors and partners; 12. community intervention/actions for reducing identified risks where applicable.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.28
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division: Toolkit for Practitioners

Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division: Toolkit for Practitioners

Purpose

The overall purpose of this toolkit is to explain to practitioners: what participatory tools are available for rapid market-problem diagnosis, socio-economic and gender targeting and, for each tool, how to use it, how to analyse the information and how to use the findings in designing, implementing and evaluating projects.

This toolkit should be used in conjunction with the sourcebook.

Overview

The toolkit is divided into three parts:

  • Diagnostic study tool: It is divided into two parts: the first section provides hands-on practitioners with an overview of the factors to consider in planning and implementing participatory gender and market linkage diagnostic studies and the second section presents Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) tools designed for rapid diagnosis of: (a) village-level marketing issues; (b) poverty-targeting issues and (c) gender issues
  • Stakeholder workshop tool: it has two main sections: stakeholder analysis tools; and tools for problem identification and participatory planning. The latter section also spells out procedures for selecting focal area representatives in a democratic and equitable way.
  • Gender and poverty-sensitive monitoring and evaluation (M&E) tool: focuses primarily on tools for participatory impact assessment. It has two parts: The first section presents factors to consider in planning and implementing rapid impact assessments; and the second section presents the impact assessment tools and discusses how to use them.
  • Gender-sensitive PRA templates can be found in the ‘Attachments’ towards the end of the report.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: IFAD, Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division. (November 2002). Gender strengthening programme for eastern and southern Africa division: Toolkit for practitioners. Pp. 1-182. Available from: http://www.ifad.org/gender/tools/gender/Toolkit.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: IFAD
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.01
Country: Global
Resource type: Toolkit

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