Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji

Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji

Purpose

This toolkit seeks to: raise awareness on violence against women using a human rights-based approach, increase understanding of the barriers faced by women and girls with disabilities that experience violence, and show people how they can assist in the elimination of violence against women.

This toolkit contains five modules with facilitator notes, additional information and worksheets to run the sessions. It also contains checklists that can be used in programme assessment and planning for disability inclusion. The modules cover: human rights; disability; gender; violence against women and girls with disabilities; and action planning for inclusion.

Overview

  • Types of violence include: physical violence; sexual violence; social- economic violence; and emotional violence. The consequences of violence are long-lasting, reach into all aspects of women’s lives, and can include permanent disability or death through homicide, suicide or through reduced life expectancy due to illness. While emotional violence is often considered ‘not serious’ or ‘normal’, the consequences are serious and long-lasting.
  • Domestic violence occurs because men feel entitlement over women and because the community does not value women and men equally. This difference in status is the root cause of domestic violence.
  • Appendix 1 contains a disability inclusive practice checklist.

Usage: Training

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Pacific Disability Forum (PDF) (2014). Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji (pp. 1-170). Available from: http://www.pacificdisability.org/getattachment/Resources/PDF-Resources/Toolkit-on-Eliminating-Violence-Against-Women-And-Girls-With-Disabilities-In-Fiji-(1).pdf.aspx [Accessed 8 January 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.2
Country: Fiji
Resource type: Toolkit, Training materials

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Audio visual: Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth

Audio visual: Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth

Purpose

This video provides an overview of the Canadian Red Cross Tool  ’ Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth’

Overview

The ten steps are:

  1. Be aware: Understanding abuse, violence, bullying, and harassment.
  2. Look all ways: recognising risks to all children and young people, both male and female
  3. Learn the rules of the road: the law and your responsibilities
  4. Create a prevention team
  5. Be alert: assess the risk in your organisation
  6. Develop policies and procedures that work
  7. Teach all the adults and all the kids all the issues and staying safe
  8. Know how to respond when young people are being hurt
  9. Keep working your way through the obstacles and roadblocks. It takes time and dedication
  10. Stay on course for safe environments

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and Diversity Practitioners

YouTube linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A02Ko5Eosro

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Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 12
Country: Regional

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Predictable, Preventable: Best Practices for Addressing Interpersonal and Self-Directed Violence during and after Disasters

Predictable, Preventable: Best Practices for Addressing Interpersonal and Self-Directed Violence during and after Disasters

Purpose

This advocacy report encourages making the prevention of interpersonal and self-directed violence a priority within the International Federation’s response to disasters. It highlights why and how interpersonal and self-directed violence during and after disasters is a predictable and preventable problem and the actions the International Federation and its partner agencies should take to have a more engaged role in addressing them.

Overview

  • In disaster after disaster, the risk of interpersonal and self-directed violence increases from a combination of factors. Factors include the collapse of protective systems, increased individual and community stress, individuals relying on harmful coping mechanisms such as alcohol and drugs, and crowded and insecure environments.
  • Although anyone can be vulnerable to violence, people with pre-existing vulnerabilities to violence, such as children, women and others who are marginalised, are at particular risk.
  • Although the problem of violence in disasters is complex, it is not inevitable. Violence can be prevented. The risk of violence needs to be addressed through a public health approach that is part of all programming sectors in a disaster.
  • Best practices exist and can be implemented across the disaster management cycle.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Canadian Red Cross and IFRC (2012). Predictable, Preventable: Best Practices for Addressing Interpersonal and Self-Directed Violence during and after Disasters. Pp. 1-32. Available from: http://www.ifrc.org/PageFiles/94522/ViolenceInDisasters-English-1up.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Publication date: January 1, 2012
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.33
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

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Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Purpose

This document is a resource for organisations and communities to help in the development, implementation and monitoring of concrete actions to prevent, reduce, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence—physical, sexual, emotional and neglect.

Overview

  • The ten steps are: 1. Understand the problem; 2. Recognise people’s vulnerability and resilience; 3. Define protection instruments; 4. Create a prevention team; 5. Complete a risk assessment; 6. Develop policies and procedures; 7. Educate adults, youth and children; 8. Respond to disclosures of violence; 9. Meet the challenges; and 10. Maintain safe environments.
  • Definitions of Gender-Based Violence can be found on page 15 and page 22 highlights the importance of gender inequality as a key risk factor for violence.
  • Power, when it is misused is a key root cause or social determinant of violence. The relationship between power dynamics and gender is described on page 23. Inequality, harmful attitudes about gender, control, and misuse of power can combine to heighten the risk of gender-based violence. Sample statistics on gender-based violence can be found on page 28.
  • Protection instruments for the safety of women and girls such as the UN Convention on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) are listed on page 36.
  • A gender analysis is vital for any risk assessment and should focus on men, women, girls and boys. An overview of a gender analysis is provided on page 45.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Fairholm, J., Sing, G. (2011). Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence. Canadian Red Cross. Pp. 2-99. Available from: http://www.redcross.ca/crc/documents/3-5-7-1_respected_2011_tensteps_english_c15_proof.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 4.39
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Purpose

This note provides guidance on how to integrate gender and diversity considerations when applying the community-based health and first aid (CBHFA) approach, particularly in regard to health promotion and disease prevention, Mother, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH), non-communicable diseases (NCDs), violence prevention and urban health programmes.

It contains a number of case studies from Afghanistan, Honduras, Qatar and Ireland.

A checklist for designing gender and diversity-sensitive community health programmes can be found on p.17.

Overview

  • Most interventions related to MNCH and sexual and reproductive health focus primarily on improving women and adolescent girls’ knowledge of, and practices on, MNCH issues. However, in most societies, men often control household income and hold the decision-making powers in matters that affect MNCH. Interventions that aim to build communities’ resilience and achieve improvements in MNCH need to involve older people (men and women), religious leaders and more specifically men and boys given their familial and social roles within communities in order to improve MNCH outcomes.
  • The increase in and prevalence of NCDs represents a global health crisis. The inter-linkages between MNCH and the development of NCDs are becoming increasingly clear. NCDs are the leading cause of death among women worldwide, particularly during childbearing years. The four main NCD risk factors for women and men are: unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and excessive use of alcohol.
  • Violence is among the most prominent public health problems faced today. Besides being a leading cause of mortality, many of the millions of non-fatal injuries result in life-long disabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.73
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Purpose

This document systematically reviews the main risks older people are exposed to in emergency situations. For each risk, the document also lists simple measures that can be taken within the standard programming and funding parameters of humanitarian organisations to reduce risks for older people in emergencies.

Overview

The document identifies risks in nine categories:

  1. General concerns: worsening of pre-existing marginalisation and exclusion; invisibility to humanitarian actors.
  2. Protection: not being able to leave home or IDP/refugee camps even if one wants to; being separated from family or community; being a victim of abuse; having to care for children; having housing, land and properties rights ignored; and being excluded by communal shelters.
  3. Food: not being registered for this, and having difficulties reaching the food distribution point or market; having difficulties at the food distribution point; and transporting the food home; not receiving an equal share of food within the family; and having inappropriate food.
  4. Non-food items: not having enough warm clothes /blankets; or culturally acceptable clothes; and not being included in NFI distribution lists.
  5. Shelter: not being automatically given shelter by family; having inaccessible shelter; having to sleep on cold, hard or damp surfaces; not having proper gender separation; and being grouped with unknown people.
  6. WASH: not being included in and having difficulties reaching water distribution points; having difficulties transporting water back home; having difficulties reaching and using sanitation facilities; and having difficulties disposing of waste.
  7. Nutrition: having malnutrition unchecked and untreated.
  8. Health: being more subject to ill health or injury; having difficulties accessing health services; inappropriate health services; and difficulties accessing psychological support.
  9. Recovery: being excluded from rehabilitation and livelihood projects; and not being able to earn a living

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (May 2012). Older people in emergencies – Identifying and reducing risks. Pp. 2-13. Available from: http://www.helpage.org/silo/files/older-people-in-emergencies–identifying-and-reducing-risks.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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IFRC Strategy on violence prevention, mitigation and response, 2011 – 2020: Strategic directions to address interpersonal and self-directed violence

IFRC Strategy on violence prevention, mitigation and response, 2011 – 2020: Strategic directions to address interpersonal and self-directed violence

Purpose

This document provides direction to National Societies and the Federation to support the aims and enabling actions of the IFRC Strategy 2020 in relation to self-directed and interpersonal violence, including urban violence.

Overview

  • Part 1 of the document outlines the purpose, scope, and basis for the strategy.
  • Part 2 of the document discusses why violence is a great humanitarian challenge, describing its impact, categories of vulnerable people, root causes and the inter-relatedness of violence with other humanitarian challenges. It looks at the impact of violence on human, economic, and community development and at the root causes and social determinants of interpersonal and self-directed violence at the individual, family, community, and social/cultural levels.
  • Part 3 defines where the IFRC stands in terms of its statutory and operational framework and activities in the area of violence prevention, mitigation and response
  • Part 4 describes where the IFRC is going, through an overview of specific, measurable actions targeting each of the strategic aims and enabling actions of Strategy 2020.

Usage: Policy guidance

Audiences: National Society Leadership, Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.88
Country: Global
Resource type: Brochure

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