Comprehensive School Safety

Comprehensive School Safety

Purpose
This document aims to provide a global framework for school safety to reduce the risks of all hazards to the education sector.

Overview
This document is a revised version aligned with Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Sustainable Development Goals launched in 2015. It is mutually agreed b y the key stakeholders engagaed in school safety as part of the Global Alliance for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience in the Edfucation Sector (GADRRRES). IFRC is part of this alliance.

Usage: Policy development and guidance for implementation

Audience: School safety decision makers and technical staff

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Document Data

Author: GADRRRES
Publication date: January 1, 2017
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 4.1
Country: Global
Resource type: Guidelines, Policy

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Myanmar Red Cross Society Reaching Out to the New Generation – Stories from the Field

Myanmar Red Cross Society Reaching Out to the New Generation – Stories from the Field

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Word Size (MB): Size: 2.5
Country: Myanmar
Tagged in: Education
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Purpose

This guide gives suggestions on how to address gender and women’s empowerment in climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR) projects, or projects which have integrated climate change and DRR considerations.

Overview

Three steps are involved in conducting a gender analysis:

  • Analyse the broader context: This includes exploring gender and sex-disaggregated secondary data; mapping policies and laws related to human rights and gender policies, and commitments and implementation of Conventions such as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW); investigating wider cultural norms, values and practices related to gender (for example, expectations of how individuals should act, or customs related to marriage).
  • Select and investigate key areas: investigating key areas related to the type of intervention being designed or implemented; exploring these areas through review of secondary data and exercises with participants and stakeholders; paying attention to the individual, relational and structural levels.
  • Prioritise practical and strategic gender issues: identifying practical issues which involve addressing immediate gender issues and needs, such as providing financial training for women business owners so that they may improve their income. Practical needs should be addressed in order to ensure the equal and sustainable impact of projects. It is also important to identify strategic factors, such as laws or social norms, which must be tackled in order to transform unequal gender relations in the long-term. If strategic factors are ignored, practical solutions are likely to have minimal sustainable impact.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Coulier, M. & Konstantinidis, D. (June 2015). Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide. Care International in Vietnam (pp. 1-101). Available from: http://careclimatechange.org/tool-kits/making-it-count-integrating-gender/ [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction into the Education Sector in Lao PDR – External References

Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction into the Education Sector in Lao PDR – External References

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Lao
Resource type: Report

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Impacts of Disasters on the Education Sector in Lao PDR – External References

Impacts of Disasters on the Education Sector in Lao PDR – External References

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.706
Country: Lao
Resource type: Brochure, Report

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Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Purpose

This study’s overall objective is to provide information on the collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD), and gender and generational analyses of SADD. It is intended to inform assessment processes by humanitarian actors responding to natural disasters and situations of armed conflict.

Overview

  • The document focuses on five clusters (education, emergency shelter, food security, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)). Within each cluster, it presents information from the published literature on how gender and age matter within these sectors for people living in crises caused by natural disaster and armed conflict. It then draws on interviews and published literature to examine if SADD is collected by UN lead cluster agencies, their partners and local agencies operating within these clusters and if so what, if any, difference it makes for programming.
  • Collection and use of SADD and gender and generational analyses enable operational agencies to deliver assistance more effectively and efficiently than without those data and findings, as illustrated by case studies and examples.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Dyan Mazurana, Prisca Benelli, Huma Gupta and Peter Walker, “Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies.” Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, August 2011.

 

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School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All

School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All

Purpose

This paper highlights some of the available evidence on School-Related Gender-Based violence (SRGBV) and presents new analysis of data from international and regional learning assessments. It highlights the gaps in our ability to track SRGBV and respond to it effectively.

The paper also draws on lessons learned from successful interventions to document what works to address SRGBV, and makes policy recommendations for global and national stakeholders.

Overview

  • SRGBV is an appalling phenomenon that undermines efforts to provide good quality education and achieve Education for All. It has consequences on attendance, learning and completion of all learners, and has wider negative impacts on families and communities.
  • Schools are the place where SRGBV occurs, but they are also the place where it can stop. Schools should be learning environments where social norms and gender inequalities are challenged and transformed, including attitudes and practices condoning violence. SRGBV cannot be addressed unless it is better understood. The inability to recognise and respond to SRGBV prevents the transformation of schools into empowering spaces for girls, boys and teachers.
  • The international community will soon confirm its post-2015 commitment to ‘ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This laudable goal will not be achieved unless gender is recognised as a driving factor in school violence, strong monitoring frameworks are adopted and genuine commitment is made to eliminate gender-based violence in schools.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: UNESCO (March 2015). School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All. Pp.1-16. Available from: http://www.ungei.org/resources/files/232107E.pdf [Accessed: 18 July 2016].

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Document Data

Author: UNESCO
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.86
Country: Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

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Gender-Inclusive Disaster Risk Management

Gender-Inclusive Disaster Risk Management

Purpose

This paper looks at key gender issues in disaster-risk management, gender-inclusive assessments, gender-design elements in strengthening disaster resilience, and gender-design elements in disaster recovery assistance. It includes case studies from Pakistan, Aceh in Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

Overview

  • Key gender issues include: disaster impacts are not gender-neutral; gender roles can change in disaster settings; gendered response can reduce long-term social consequences; and women as agents of change for disaster-risk reduction and strengthening resilience.
  • Features of a gender-inclusive assessment include: gender-differentiated target groups; sex-disaggregated data; data collectors representative of target population; culturally appropriate and participatory methodology; gender-sensitive training; and additional preparation.
  • Gender design elements in strengthening disaster resilience include: strengthening disaster resilience/gender-inclusive disaster resilience at the national level/community level; and capacity building and project management.
  • Gender design elements in disaster recovery assistance include: community infrastructure reconstruction; water supply and sanitation; housing reconstruction; livelihood restoration programmes; rural roads reconstruction; health service; and education.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank. (February 2014). Gender-inclusive disaster risk management. Pp. 1-12. Available from:http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-gender-inclusive-disaster-risk-management.  [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Document Data

Author: ADB
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.38
Country: Global
Resource type: Briefing paper, Report, Research

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Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Purpose

This handbook offers real and practical guidance on identifying and addressing the differing needs and situations of women, girls, boys and men; in other words, being sensitive to gender issues in humanitarian crises.

Overview

The handbook is divided into two sections:

  • Section A: This section includes four chapters covering the core principles, mandates, definitions and frameworks for gender equality: Basics of gender in emergencies sets out the overarching framework of gender equality programming in humanitarian action. It defines terms and explains the relevance of gender equality in crisis situations; International Legal Framework for Protection provides information on mandates coming from human rights, humanitarian and refugee law; Coordination on Gender Equality in Emergencies describes the elements of effective coordination and the establishment of gender networks in emergencies; Participation in Humanitarian Action discusses the importance of ensuring the equal participation of women, girls, boys and men in all aspects of humanitarian action, provides participation standards and gives examples on “how to” participate in a crisis.
  • Section B: This section provides sector and cluster-specific guidance. It covers the following areas: camp coordination and camp management; education; food issues; health; livelihoods; non-food items; registration; shelter; water, sanitation and hygiene. Each chapter is divided into: gender analysis; actions; checklist; and resources.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action. (December 2006). Women, girls, boys and men: Different needs – equal opportunities. Pp. 1-113.                                        Available from: https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Gender%20Handbook.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Document Data

Author: IASC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.33
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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