Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRR) Manual in Lao PDR

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRR) Manual in Lao PDR

Purpose:

The CBDRR Manual is a practical ‘how-to’ guide on community-based disaster risk reduction for government and non-government agencies in Lao PDR. It is a commonly agreed document to be referred to by agencies working on CBDRR in Lao PDR. It provides guidance and support for systematic implementation of CBDRR programs by explaining each of the steps as well as tools used.

The manual will also support the Government of Lao PDR (GoL) to monitor CBDRR activities, oversee progress of activities implemented by different actors and locations, provide necessary support on CBDRR technical knowledge as well as provide a reference point for replication of initiatives for local government and implementing agencies.

The manual was developed through a series of consultations with key stakeholders working on CBDRR in the country both from government and non-government agencies. Therefore, the CBDRR manual is based on
common activities implemented by different stakeholders in Lao PDR incorporating country regulations, government perspective and concerns.

Overview:

The CBDRR manual consists of:

Part I is an introductory part which gives background information about CBDRR in Lao PDR (including the importance of CBDRR in Lao PDR, the stakeholders of CBDRR in the country, as well as an overview about
the challenges and opportunities when implementing CBDRR in Lao PDR).

Part II contains the instructions on how to conduct the eight step process agreed upon by government and non government agencies working on CBDRR in Lao PDR. The 8 steps involved are:
Step 1: Pilot site selection
Step 2: Baseline study
Step 3: Capacity building for CBDRR facilitators
Step 4: Capacity building for VDPCC
Step 5: Community disaster risk assessment
Step 6: Participatory disaster risk management planning
Step 7: Community managed-implementation
Step 8: Participatory monitoring and evaluation

Usage: Guideline for implementation and monitoring

Target audience: National Society staff and volunteers

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.3
Country: Lao
Resource type: Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Introduction to Resilience workshop Thailand from 9 – 13 November 2015

Introduction to Resilience workshop Thailand from 9 – 13 November 2015

Purpose:

 

Overview:

 

Usage: Training

Audience: National Society leadership, Technical staff, Communication staff

For related documents, click here:

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Excel Size (MB): Size: 0.02
Country: Thailand
Resource type: Training materials

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Purpose:

This guide has been developed to support Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and IFRC staff in more systematically integrating risk reduction measures into their planning. It describes in detail what key issues need to be considered, and when. The guidance aims at ensuring that risk reduction measures are taken into account in different sectors and contexts. It also details the key elements that need to be in place to create an enabling environment.

Overview:

  • General steps for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) are: DRR and CCA screening. The strategy, policy, programme or project in question must be first screened with a DRR and CCA lens, and then a detailed assessment made. If this shows that disaster and climate change risks have not been duly considered or addressed, then adjustments should be made to the planned activity. A monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework should also be developed. Mainstreaming DRR and CCA can be ensured only when the process is regularly monitored and evaluated.
  • The paper details six specific programming contexts (conflict, urban, reducing vulnerability, strengthening resilience, disaster preparedness, disaster response, and recovery) and key sectors (health and care; water, sanitation and hygiene; migration; shelter and settlement; livelihood and food security; natural resource management) for mainstreaming DRR and CCA. Each of these is accompanied by specific key principles of DRR and CCA mainstreaming, as well as good practice checklists. Aside from the context-specific guidance, there are two general principles: first, a National Society needs to ensure that it has adequate capacity at relevant levels to mainstream DRR and CCA; second, given that risk patterns change, risk should be monitored at least once per year. If changes in circumstances and risk are identified, programming choices and activities may need to be adapted to these changes.
  • A gender good practice checklist can be found on p.52.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2013). A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (pp. 1-62).

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support (A Training Package for Community Volunteers)

Purpose

This document provides guidelines to volunteers on the following issues: what is gender; gender and HIV; gender and HIV prevention; gender and HIV treatment; and the role of gender in care and support.

Overview

The purpose of session one is to ensure that community based volunteers (CBVs) are able to define gender and understand the role that gender plays in the lives of men, women, girls and boys in their community.

Session two seeks to understand how gender and HIV are related and explore how gender inequalities, gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) are linked to HIV.

Session three explores the ways in which gender influences the vulnerability of women, men, girls and boys to HIV infection/re-infection and the role of CBVs in providing information and support.

Session four builds knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of people to access, prepare for and adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the role of CBVs in providing gender-responsive support.

The purpose of session five is to provide participants with the knowledge and skills to understand how gender influences the ability of CBVs to provide care for others and to care for themselves.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Gender and diversity practitioners

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Purpose

This manual serves to equip the Canadian Red Cross team with the knowledge and tools to act as trainers for their partners and community-based organisations/associations/committees constituted as part of their programme.

The manual has six units which are to be treated as sessions. The lessons in each unit are sub-sessions, and where required each lesson is further divided into topics.

Overview

A trainer’s guide containing guidelines on how to deliver training can be found on p.6 of the document.

  • Unit 1 provides a broad overview of ageing at global and national levels and helps to get an insight into the need for mainstreaming age friendliness.
  • Unit 2 focuses on mobilising older people of the community.
  • Unit 3 lists a few means to understand the vulnerabilities of older people and also to tap into their capacities so that they can contribute to the overall welfare of the community.
  • Unit 4 provides a detailed overview of the different dynamics that affect older people in disasters.
  • Unit 5 focuses on the various dynamics associated with older women and older people with disabilities.
  • Unit 6 provides tools to assess age friendliness of a project, older people’s involvement in community based-organisations, capturing impact on older people, and tips to include older people in impact-monitoring and/or an evaluation process.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Canadian Red Cross, HelpAge International. Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia. . Pp. 1-96.

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practice in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts in Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • The capacity-building process involves communities identifying their needs, volunteers offering their time, staff coordinating resources, and domestic and international partners providing support where necessary. It ultimately helps the vulnerable better manage their lives, reduce the risks they face and improve their long-term health, well-being and livelihoods.
  • In Mongolia the Red Cross strives to ensure that the voices of groups such as the elderly, disabled and women-headed households, which will usually not be heard, are included in planning and branch activities.
  • In Nepal, involvement with Red Cross programmes have improved the lives of Nepalese women, especially in terms of challenges faced by them in the community, which limit their participation in discussions about decisions affecting them.
  • Many Cambodians have experienced social isolation, exclusion or discrimination in different forms as victims of the AIDS virus, war or sexual assault. The Red Cross empowers such people as volunteers to achieve new and appreciated roles in their communities.
  • In Australia, the Red Cross has increased its attention to the needs of groups who have been marginalised socially, economically and culturally.

Usage: Training; Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Volunteers, youth, technical staff

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practices in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts from Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • To start a participatory planning process a local Red Cross/Red Crescent branch should organise a discussion with vulnerable groups. This should include local government and other organisations that can meet some of the needs of the people. From these discussions come ideas for services, offers for community help such as volunteers and locally raised funds. Once a programme is designed and implemented with community participation, the community should give regular feedback to the Red Cross/Red Crescent to ensure that the service meets their needs or to suggest how it could be improved.
  • In deciding its role to support the supply of clean drinking water, and other basic schemes, the Nepal Red Cross ensured that it closely consulted affected communities.
  • In Cambodia, where flood, drought, storm and fire are the most frequent natural disasters, the Red Cross uses participatory planning with communities affected by regular disasters to strengthen community capacities.
  • The Red Cross in Mongolia set up volunteer councils as a new way to listen to the needs of specific groups of people such as the youth, elderly and disabled.
  • In Australia the Red Cross decided to find ways to work with young people, to understand better their needs and vulnerabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Youth

The video could be accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bft-_gKvt8

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.63
Country: Global, Regional

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Purpose

This document outlines four criteria for assessing project/programme plans.  The criteria might not be applicable to projects that do not deal directly with populations affected by crisis or at risk.

Overview

The four criteria are:

  • Gender and diversity analysis and sex- and age-disaggregated data: how does the project take into consideration differences between girls, boys, women and men of different age groups in terms of their roles, responsibilities and control over resources, including their level of access to assistance; effects of the crisis or risk; capacities for coping with, responding to, recovering from and preparing for crises; and specific needs expectations and constraints?
  • Adapted assistance/services: what measures are taken to ensure that assistance and services provided by the project are accessible, affordable, acceptable and appropriate to gender and diversity concerns?
  • Negative effects: are potential negative effects of the project/programme on sex/age and diverse groups identified and prevented or mitigated?
  • Adequate participation of vulnerable and at-risk groups: how are sex/age and diverse groups consulted, informed and integrated in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project?

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Norwegian Red Cross (20 January 2015). Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3. Pp.2-69.  Available from: https://www.rodekors.no/Global/HK%20-%20Hovedkontoret/Internasjonal/Dokumenter/Gender/Final%20report,%20NorCross%20Gender%20Plan%20of%20Action%202009-2014.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Purpose

This document is a resource for organisations and communities to help in the development, implementation and monitoring of concrete actions to prevent, reduce, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence—physical, sexual, emotional and neglect.

Overview

  • The ten steps are: 1. Understand the problem; 2. Recognise people’s vulnerability and resilience; 3. Define protection instruments; 4. Create a prevention team; 5. Complete a risk assessment; 6. Develop policies and procedures; 7. Educate adults, youth and children; 8. Respond to disclosures of violence; 9. Meet the challenges; and 10. Maintain safe environments.
  • Definitions of Gender-Based Violence can be found on page 15 and page 22 highlights the importance of gender inequality as a key risk factor for violence.
  • Power, when it is misused is a key root cause or social determinant of violence. The relationship between power dynamics and gender is described on page 23. Inequality, harmful attitudes about gender, control, and misuse of power can combine to heighten the risk of gender-based violence. Sample statistics on gender-based violence can be found on page 28.
  • Protection instruments for the safety of women and girls such as the UN Convention on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) are listed on page 36.
  • A gender analysis is vital for any risk assessment and should focus on men, women, girls and boys. An overview of a gender analysis is provided on page 45.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Fairholm, J., Sing, G. (2011). Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence. Canadian Red Cross. Pp. 2-99. Available from: http://www.redcross.ca/crc/documents/3-5-7-1_respected_2011_tensteps_english_c15_proof.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 4.39
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

South Asia Earthquake – Pakistan: Ensuring Gender Equity and Community Participation in Watsan Programme

South Asia Earthquake – Pakistan: Ensuring Gender Equity and Community Participation in Watsan Programme
Purpose

This case study looks at some of the activities and interventions that took place in communities affected by the earthquake in Banian Union Council in Battagram district, in northern Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province on 8 October, 2005.

Overview

Activities and interventions undertaken aimed to improve hygiene practices and behaviour while encouraging gender equity and community participation. They were based on the minimum SPHERE standards for emergencies and the Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) process. PHAST is a participatory approach that enables service providers to work with communities, helps people feel more confident and empowers them to make decisions on key hygiene practices and behaviour within the family and community.

Some of the challenges faced, in terms of providing sanitation facilities in Pakistan, were related to cultural practices. Lack of community consultation at the beginning of the intervention led to limited results. This situation radically changed when the community participation element was developed through the PHAST process.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audience: Technical staff

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.97
Country: Global
Resource type: Case study

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

[an error occurred while processing the directive]