IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH)

IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH)

Purpose

Why does gender equality matter in emergency Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) interventions? This document addresses this issue as well as the steps involved in providing emergency WASH programming.

Overview

The steps involved in providing emergency WASH programming that is effective, safe and restores dignity include: a needs assessment; activities and outcomes. A needs assessment is the essential first step. A gender analysis is also critical to understanding the social and gender dynamics that could help or hinder aid effectiveness. The gender analysis in the needs assessment will identify gender gaps such as unequal access to WASH services for women/girls and men/boys that need to be addressed. These should be integrated into activities. The project’s outcomes should capture the change that is expected for female and male beneficiaries.

Actions that can be used when designing or vetting a gender integrated project, and that can be a useful reference in designing minimum gender commitments include: analysing the impact of the crisis on women, men, boys and girls and what this entails in terms of division of tasks/labour, workload and access to WASH services; taking specific action to prevent risks of GBV, consulting girls and women at all stages of the WASH project, particularly about the location and the design of water points, showers and toilets in order to reduce time spent waiting and collecting water and to mitigate incidences of violence; ensuring that evaluation and translation teams include female staff; ensuring women, men, boys and girls participate equally in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian WASH response; ensuring women, men, boys and girls can access WASH services equally; and, based on gender analysis, making sure that women, girls, boys and men are targeted with specific actions when appropriate.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) (September 2012). IASC Gender Marker Tip Sheet: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) (pp. 1-2). Available from: http://reliefweb.int/report/world/iasc-gender-marker-tip-sheet-water-sanitation-hygiene-wash [Accessed: 31 December 2015].

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Author: IASC
Publication date: September 1, 2012
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.296
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans

Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans

Purpose

This tip sheet presents key factors for effective reviewing, monitoring, and reporting on gender action plan implementation. It includes case studies from Lao and Nepal.

Overview

Key factors for effective monitoring and reporting include: routine collection of sex-disaggregated data for meaningful assessment of a project’s progress and gender equality results and outcomes; continuous dialogue, guidance, and supervision by resident mission (RM) and project gender specialists (GSs) for timely gender action plan (GAP) implementation; gender-inclusive project monitoring mechanisms such as the design and monitoring framework (DMF) to facilitate the monitoring, measuring, and reporting of gender-related targets, indicators, and results on men and women’s participation, access to project resources, benefits, and impacts; project Gender Action Plan (GAP) implementation monitoring matrix, identify obstacles and solutions to achievement of GAP targets, and summarise gender results in the project completion report; Gender capacity development for EAs/IAs on project- and sector-based gender issues organised by RM GSs on a regular basis to help project teams and directors improve GAP implementation, monitoring, and reporting; standardisation of project reporting to consolidate sector- and country-based gender results.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank (April 2013). Project Reviews: Monitoring and Reporting on Gender Action Plans (pp. 1-4). Tip sheet No. 2. Available from: http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-no-4-project-reviews-monitoring-and-reporting-gender-action-plans [Accessed: 28 December 2015].

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Author: Others
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.436
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan

Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan

Purpose

This tip sheet shows how to prepare a project gender action plan and how this ensures gender-inclusive design and implementation of Asian Development Bank (ADB) projects.

The tip sheet provides an overview of what a Gender Action Plan (GAP) is, the importance of a GAP and what to watch out for when preparing one. It also provides key steps and tips to strengthen project design and good practices for developing effective project GAPs. It concludes with a good practice example of a sustainable rural infrastructure improvement project in Bangladesh.

Overview

Key steps in GAP preparation include:

  • Baseline data collection and setting targets: Without sex-disaggregated baseline data and gender analysis, it is not possible to identify realistic gender-based targets for the GAP and the design monitoring framework (DMF) that are relevant to overall project outcomes and outputs. In the absence of reliable national databases, developing project-specific baseline data is essential to understand the different roles, responsibilities, constraints, and needs of men and women in project areas for effective project design, progress monitoring, and impact evaluation.
  • Focusing gender analysis in project design on: access and control; access to and control of resources; decision-making power; need and priorities and institutional capacity.
  • Ownership of GAPs: To achieve gender-inclusive project results, project executing and implementing agencies need to fully understand and own GAPs. As a first step, detailed GAPs need to be developed jointly with project executing and implementing agencies using participatory approaches during the project inception phase, which will need to be followed by ongoing support, mentoring, and formal gender training during project implementation.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Asian Development Bank (April 2013). Preparing a Project Gender Action Plan (pp. 1-4). Tip Sheet No. 2. Available from: http://www.adb.org/documents/tip-sheet-no-2-preparing-project-gender-action-plan [Accessed: 28 December 2015].

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Author: Others
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.391
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

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Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Purpose

This toolkit introduces the European Commission’s new Gender-Age Marker for humanitarian action. It provides an overview of the tool and its application, as well as guidance on how to integrate gender and age concerns in humanitarian action and on how to apply the marker to humanitarian projects.

Overview

The Gender-Age Marker uses four criteria to assess how strongly humanitarian actions integrate gender and age considerations: gender and age analysis / SADD; adapted assistance; negative effects; and adequate participation.

  • Chapter 1 on the operational importance of gender and age presents arguments and examples demonstrating that humanitarian aid is of higher quality and more effective if it integrates issues relating to gender and age.
  • Chapter 2 provides tip sheets on integrating gender and age in humanitarian actions to support humanitarian workers in making their actions more sensitive to gender and age issues.
  • Chapter 3 provides detailed guidance on how to use the Gender-Age Marker in humanitarian actions.
  • Chapter 4 provides guidance on how to deal with difficult cases when using the Gender-Age Marker. For instance what to do if: only one dimension (age or gender) is well reflected; another important diversity dimension is missing; the context makes it difficult to integrate gender and age; the partner has made progress but still does not meet the criteria; the action is heterogeneous; there are no potential negative effects; different age brackets are used to report beneficiary data.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Steets, J., Binder, A. & Foran, S. (2013). Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit. European Commission (pp. 1-83). Available from: http://ec.europa.eu/echo/files/policies/sectoral/gender_age_marker_toolkit.pdf [Accessed 8 January 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.886
Country: Regional

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Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

Purpose

This publication aims to shed some light on women’s capabilities to take leading roles in building disaster resilience. It features women as drivers of change in different socio-economic contexts, and under various gender conditions.

The publication includes case studies from 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Oceania. For each case study it looks at the initiative, its impact and results, the good practices, lessons learned and potential for replication.

Overview

  • Based on the success of the Girls in Risk Reduction Leadership (GIRRL) Project of the African Centre for Disaster Studies (ACDS), a project is under way in Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe, adapting GIRRL to local contexts. Trained as leaders and resource persons, participating school girls have gained better social status and taken up leadership roles, serving as key Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) informants. The girls also identified potential hazards and encouraged DRR measures. Through them, gender equity is introduced into DRR work.
  • Following the Black Saturday bushfires in Australia on Saturday 7 February 2009, research was conducted to throw some light on what actually happens to women during a disaster and its aftermath in Australia. Based on its findings, a series of women-led actions and events took place, leading to many Australian ‘firsts’, of which the creation of Australia’s first Gender & Disaster Taskforce, a key body for advancing gender and disaster issues in Victoria.
  • Some remote coastal villages in southern Bangladesh are not yet reached by the country’s national disaster management system. In light of the above, Action Against Hunger (ACF) implemented a Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) pilot project in 10 villages, establishing a Village Disaster Management Committee (VDMC) and a Women’s Committee (WC) in each of them. When a tropical storm struck, shortly after the end of the project, the women put in practice the disaster preparedness measures that had been explained to them. They protected their lives and livelihoods, on their own initiative, without the intervention of the national disaster management system.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015). Women’s Leadership in Risk- Resilient Development: Good Practices and Lessons Learned (pp. 1-96). Available from: http://www.unisdr.org/files/42882_42882womensleadershipinriskresilien.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015].

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Author: UN
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2
Country: Regional
Resource type: Case study

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Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning

Purpose

This document looks at the impact achieved by a UN Women programme that strengthens the role women play in disaster-risk reduction and disaster-reduction management in Vietnam.

Overview

  • Prior to the project, there were few women on the Committees for Flood and Storm Control (CFSC). Through the training of women in disaster management, as well as national lobbying – supported by UN Women, UNDP and other stakeholders – the contribution of women has been recognised. A government decree, issued in September 2013, provides an official space for the Women’s Union in decision-making boards of the CFSC at all levels.
  • Beneficiaries stated that due to good preparation and the detailed mapping that was developed in meetings before each storm, nobody in the village was killed or injured severely in the last storm season. They also discussed at meetings how to encourage people to harvest earlier before the storm season started.
  • A four-year-old boy was saved from drowning because his mother performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on him. She and another 120 women and girls learned this life-saving technique from the rescue and first aid training provided by the project.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Volunteers

Reference: UN Women (2014). Lives Saved in Vietnam by Involving Women in Disaster Planning. Impact Story (pp. 1-2). Available from: http://www.unwomen.org/~/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/library/publications/2014/un%20women_vietnam_us_web.pdf [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Author: UN Women
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.367
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Case study

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Accountability to Beneficiaries and Beneficiary Communications and Gender and Diversity

Accountability to Beneficiaries and Beneficiary Communications and Gender and Diversity

Purpose:

This presentation considered what accountability to beneficiaries (AtB) and beneficiary communications (BC) mean and why they are important. What are the links between AtB and BC and the links between gender and diversity and BC? Why should beneficiary communications be gender and diversity-sensitive?

Overview:

The four components of programme accountability are transparency, participation, project monitoring and evaluation (M&E), and feedback, complaints and response.

Gender and diversity sensitive programming is a fundamental part of being accountable to beneficiaries. Therefore, the use of beneficiary communications approaches to deliver accountability should be gender and diversity-sensitive.

Tips for making assessments and programme design gender and diversity-sensitive include: speaking to all types of community members; consulting with men and women or specific groups separately; presenting disaggregated assessments findings and recommendations; and trying to ensure that, where possible, Red Cross teams and committees reflect gender balance and the diversity of the community.

The slides include questions to consider for gender-sensitive message design and delivery.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation; training

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Communication staff, National society leadership, Technical staff, Volunteers

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Author: IFRC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB):
Country: Regional

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Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Purpose

This guide gives suggestions on how to address gender and women’s empowerment in climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR) projects, or projects which have integrated climate change and DRR considerations.

Overview

Three steps are involved in conducting a gender analysis:

  • Analyse the broader context: This includes exploring gender and sex-disaggregated secondary data; mapping policies and laws related to human rights and gender policies, and commitments and implementation of Conventions such as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW); investigating wider cultural norms, values and practices related to gender (for example, expectations of how individuals should act, or customs related to marriage).
  • Select and investigate key areas: investigating key areas related to the type of intervention being designed or implemented; exploring these areas through review of secondary data and exercises with participants and stakeholders; paying attention to the individual, relational and structural levels.
  • Prioritise practical and strategic gender issues: identifying practical issues which involve addressing immediate gender issues and needs, such as providing financial training for women business owners so that they may improve their income. Practical needs should be addressed in order to ensure the equal and sustainable impact of projects. It is also important to identify strategic factors, such as laws or social norms, which must be tackled in order to transform unequal gender relations in the long-term. If strategic factors are ignored, practical solutions are likely to have minimal sustainable impact.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Coulier, M. & Konstantinidis, D. (June 2015). Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide. Care International in Vietnam (pp. 1-101). Available from: http://careclimatechange.org/tool-kits/making-it-count-integrating-gender/ [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual

Purpose

This training manual seeks to fill gaps in practical guidance in gender mainstreaming in disaster risk management at local and community level. It aims to strengthen participants’ knowledge and skills in integrating gender in the concepts and practices of Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM).

In general, the training aims to integrate gender perspective in disaster risk management to ensure that both women and men have the necessary capacities in addressing their respective vulnerabilities to enable them to protect themselves, their families and their immediate communities.

Overview

The training curriculum is divided into five modules. For each module it details the purpose of the learning objectives, key points, methodology, process and materials needed for the training. It also gives an estimated duration for the module.

  • Understanding Disasters and Community-Based Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at local disaster experiences, basic concepts, disaster and community-based disaster risk management. Pages 40-43 look at gender and gender-sensitive disaster risk management.
  • Gender Perspective in CBDRM: This module looks at the need for gender-sensitive CBDRM and how to integrate the gender perspective in CBDRM.
  • Gender-Sensitive Risk Assessment: This module looks at hazard assessment, participatory vulnerability and capacity assessment and gender-sensitive community risk assessment hands-on. Pages 85-87 look at how gender relations shape the four factors of vulnerability: economic, social, physical and environmental. A checklist for gender-sensitive risk assessment can be found on pp. 104-105.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management: This module looks at gender-sensitive disaster risk reduction and emergency response and recovery.
  • Gender-Sensitive Disaster Risk Management Planning: This module looks at gender-sensitive CBDRM planning (action planning). A framework for using gender equality and women’s empowerment can be found on p. 153.

Usage: Training

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Technical staff

Reference: Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (2010). Integrating Gender into Community-Based Disaster Risk Management. Training Manual (pp. 1-174). Available from: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/14452_genderincbdrm1.pdf [Accessed: 22 December 2015].

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Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1

Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1

Purpose

This document provides case studies of initiatives that have been taken in Asia to promote equal treatment of all in society before, during and after disasters.

Overview

The document provides an overview of the following case studies: a disaster risk reduction (DRR) gender checklist prepared to ensure the implementation of gender inclusive and responsive DRR in the Philippines; women-friendly spaces set up in Pakistan in the aftermath of floods that hit Pakistan in 2010. These centres provide safe spaces for women affected by gender-based violence, providing psychosocial support as well as opportunities to participate in local support groups and receive information about gender-based violence; and promoting gender equality in disaster response in Nepal after the earthquake in 2015.

Page 6 contains a gender emergency checklist for Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners, Technical staff, Volunteers

Reference: OCHA (2015). Integrating Gender into Humanitarian Action: Good Practices from Asia 1 (pp. 1-8). Available from: http://www.adpc.net/igo/category/ID991/doc/2015-vAQd72-ADPC-Integrating_Gender_into_Humanitarian_Action_1.pdf [Accessed: 21 December 2015].

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