A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Purpose:

This guide has been developed to support Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and IFRC staff in more systematically integrating risk reduction measures into their planning. It describes in detail what key issues need to be considered, and when. The guidance aims at ensuring that risk reduction measures are taken into account in different sectors and contexts. It also details the key elements that need to be in place to create an enabling environment.

Overview:

  • General steps for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) are: DRR and CCA screening. The strategy, policy, programme or project in question must be first screened with a DRR and CCA lens, and then a detailed assessment made. If this shows that disaster and climate change risks have not been duly considered or addressed, then adjustments should be made to the planned activity. A monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework should also be developed. Mainstreaming DRR and CCA can be ensured only when the process is regularly monitored and evaluated.
  • The paper details six specific programming contexts (conflict, urban, reducing vulnerability, strengthening resilience, disaster preparedness, disaster response, and recovery) and key sectors (health and care; water, sanitation and hygiene; migration; shelter and settlement; livelihood and food security; natural resource management) for mainstreaming DRR and CCA. Each of these is accompanied by specific key principles of DRR and CCA mainstreaming, as well as good practice checklists. Aside from the context-specific guidance, there are two general principles: first, a National Society needs to ensure that it has adequate capacity at relevant levels to mainstream DRR and CCA; second, given that risk patterns change, risk should be monitored at least once per year. If changes in circumstances and risk are identified, programming choices and activities may need to be adapted to these changes.
  • A gender good practice checklist can be found on p.52.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2013). A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (pp. 1-62).

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Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Purpose

This study’s overall objective is to provide information on the collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD), and gender and generational analyses of SADD. It is intended to inform assessment processes by humanitarian actors responding to natural disasters and situations of armed conflict.

Overview

  • The document focuses on five clusters (education, emergency shelter, food security, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)). Within each cluster, it presents information from the published literature on how gender and age matter within these sectors for people living in crises caused by natural disaster and armed conflict. It then draws on interviews and published literature to examine if SADD is collected by UN lead cluster agencies, their partners and local agencies operating within these clusters and if so what, if any, difference it makes for programming.
  • Collection and use of SADD and gender and generational analyses enable operational agencies to deliver assistance more effectively and efficiently than without those data and findings, as illustrated by case studies and examples.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Dyan Mazurana, Prisca Benelli, Huma Gupta and Peter Walker, “Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies.” Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, August 2011.

 

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Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies

Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies

Purpose

The primary purpose of these guidelines is to enable humanitarian actors and communities to plan, establish, and coordinate a set of minimum multi-sectoral interventions to prevent and respond to sexual violence during the early phase of an emergency.

Overview

  • Three sets of activities are included in the guidelines: 1) overview of activities to be undertaken in the preparedness phase; 2) detailed implementation of minimum prevention and response during the early stages of the emergency; and 3) overview of comprehensive action to be taken in more stabilised phases and during recovery and rehabilitation.
  • The guidelines recommend specific key interventions for preventing and responding to gender-based violence in humanitarian emergencies. The matrix in Chapter 3 is an overview of recommended key interventions for preventing and responding to sexual violence, organised by the three general phases of emergencies: emergency preparedness; early phase (minimum prevention and response); and stabilised phase (comprehensive prevention and response).
  • The guideline also includes action sheets for minimum prevention and response: the action sheets are organised by sectors and cross-cutting functions. There are five cross-cutting functions that require action from multiple organisations and sectors. These are: coordination; assessment and monitoring; protection; human resources; and information education communication. In addition to the cross-cutting functions, there are specific interventions organised by sector: protection; water and sanitation; food security and nutrition; shelter and site planning and non-food items; health and community services; and education.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2005). Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies. Global Protection Cluster. Pp. 1-342. Available from: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2014_2019/documents/femm/dv/gbv_toolkit_book_01_20_2015_/gbv_toolkit_book_01_20_2015_en.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Document Data

Author: IASC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.84
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Purpose

This document systematically reviews the main risks older people are exposed to in emergency situations. For each risk, the document also lists simple measures that can be taken within the standard programming and funding parameters of humanitarian organisations to reduce risks for older people in emergencies.

Overview

The document identifies risks in nine categories:

  1. General concerns: worsening of pre-existing marginalisation and exclusion; invisibility to humanitarian actors.
  2. Protection: not being able to leave home or IDP/refugee camps even if one wants to; being separated from family or community; being a victim of abuse; having to care for children; having housing, land and properties rights ignored; and being excluded by communal shelters.
  3. Food: not being registered for this, and having difficulties reaching the food distribution point or market; having difficulties at the food distribution point; and transporting the food home; not receiving an equal share of food within the family; and having inappropriate food.
  4. Non-food items: not having enough warm clothes /blankets; or culturally acceptable clothes; and not being included in NFI distribution lists.
  5. Shelter: not being automatically given shelter by family; having inaccessible shelter; having to sleep on cold, hard or damp surfaces; not having proper gender separation; and being grouped with unknown people.
  6. WASH: not being included in and having difficulties reaching water distribution points; having difficulties transporting water back home; having difficulties reaching and using sanitation facilities; and having difficulties disposing of waste.
  7. Nutrition: having malnutrition unchecked and untreated.
  8. Health: being more subject to ill health or injury; having difficulties accessing health services; inappropriate health services; and difficulties accessing psychological support.
  9. Recovery: being excluded from rehabilitation and livelihood projects; and not being able to earn a living

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (May 2012). Older people in emergencies – Identifying and reducing risks. Pp. 2-13. Available from: http://www.helpage.org/silo/files/older-people-in-emergencies–identifying-and-reducing-risks.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Purpose

This briefing draws on 14 field projects to highlight common challenges of supporting older people. Eleven of the case studies summarise the key challenges and most effective responses that the experts identified during their visits. The three remaining case studies – from Darfur, the Occupied Palestinian Territories and Zimbabwe – draw on HelpAge’s own work in the field.

All the case studies demonstrate practical approaches that will help agencies increase the age-friendliness of their programming and make sure older people play an active role in their responses.

The overall aim of this good practice guide is to communicate ‘what works’, within a range of contexts, in order to promote protection initiatives for older people in emergencies that are truly inclusive.

Overview

  • This guide focuses on working practice in the following areas of humanitarian response: accessible shelter and latrines; livelihood support; access to food and accurate registration; strengthening family and community structures; better use of disaggregated data; appropriate healthcare; and mainstreaming age across clusters.
  • The examples of good practices shown in the guide have two key common elements: consultation with older people themselves and an appreciation that older people can play a vital role in developing and implementing their own solutions to the challenges they face.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (2012). Protecting older people in emergencies: good practice guide. Pp. 3-8. Available from: http://www.globalprotectioncluster.org/_assets/files/tools_and_guidance/age_gender_diversity/HelpAge_Older_People_Best_Practices_EN.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Disability Checklist for Emergency Response: Adapted from Disability Task Force

Disability Checklist for Emergency Response: Adapted from Disability Task Force

Purpose

This document provides a checklist of activities which ensure the inclusion and protection of injured and disabled people during emergencies. As well as general guidelines, it provides specific ones for: health and nutrition; water and sanitation; protection, women and children with disabilities; reconstruction and shelter; livelihoods; and education.

Overview

  • People with disabilities and injuries may not have access to the same health services or food distribution, even though they have the same, if not more, need than others. This can be due to various reasons including lack of mobility to reach food distribution site, or lack of awareness of communication messages.
  • Access to water and sanitation (WatSan) facilities are basic needs of all people with injuries and disabilities. Access to these facilities should be promoted through physical accessibility as well as a positive attitude towards encouraging people with injuries / disabilities to use them.
  • People with injuries / disabilities are especially vulnerable to physical, sexual and emotional abuse and may require additional protection. This should be included in reconstruction plans so as to improve access to shelters, schools, community health centres and other public buildings.
  • By contributing to the family income, people with disabilities can reduce their economic reliance on their family and enable the family recover from the economic effects of the disaster as soon as possible. Efforts should also be made to ensure that all children in every village start / re-start / continue going to school.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Handicap International. Disability checklist for emergency response: Adapted from disability task force. Pp.1-9. Available from:http://www.handicap-international.de/fileadmin/redaktion/pdf/disability_checklist_booklet_01.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015]

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Document Data

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.88
Country: Regional
Resource type: Checklist

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Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Purpose

This handbook offers real and practical guidance on identifying and addressing the differing needs and situations of women, girls, boys and men; in other words, being sensitive to gender issues in humanitarian crises.

Overview

The handbook is divided into two sections:

  • Section A: This section includes four chapters covering the core principles, mandates, definitions and frameworks for gender equality: Basics of gender in emergencies sets out the overarching framework of gender equality programming in humanitarian action. It defines terms and explains the relevance of gender equality in crisis situations; International Legal Framework for Protection provides information on mandates coming from human rights, humanitarian and refugee law; Coordination on Gender Equality in Emergencies describes the elements of effective coordination and the establishment of gender networks in emergencies; Participation in Humanitarian Action discusses the importance of ensuring the equal participation of women, girls, boys and men in all aspects of humanitarian action, provides participation standards and gives examples on “how to” participate in a crisis.
  • Section B: This section provides sector and cluster-specific guidance. It covers the following areas: camp coordination and camp management; education; food issues; health; livelihoods; non-food items; registration; shelter; water, sanitation and hygiene. Each chapter is divided into: gender analysis; actions; checklist; and resources.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action. (December 2006). Women, girls, boys and men: Different needs – equal opportunities. Pp. 1-113.                                        Available from: https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Gender%20Handbook.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: IASC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.33
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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