Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Purpose

This document outlines four criteria for assessing project/programme plans.  The criteria might not be applicable to projects that do not deal directly with populations affected by crisis or at risk.

Overview

The four criteria are:

  • Gender and diversity analysis and sex- and age-disaggregated data: how does the project take into consideration differences between girls, boys, women and men of different age groups in terms of their roles, responsibilities and control over resources, including their level of access to assistance; effects of the crisis or risk; capacities for coping with, responding to, recovering from and preparing for crises; and specific needs expectations and constraints?
  • Adapted assistance/services: what measures are taken to ensure that assistance and services provided by the project are accessible, affordable, acceptable and appropriate to gender and diversity concerns?
  • Negative effects: are potential negative effects of the project/programme on sex/age and diverse groups identified and prevented or mitigated?
  • Adequate participation of vulnerable and at-risk groups: how are sex/age and diverse groups consulted, informed and integrated in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project?

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Norwegian Red Cross (20 January 2015). Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3. Pp.2-69.  Available from: https://www.rodekors.no/Global/HK%20-%20Hovedkontoret/Internasjonal/Dokumenter/Gender/Final%20report,%20NorCross%20Gender%20Plan%20of%20Action%202009-2014.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence

Purpose

This document is a resource for organisations and communities to help in the development, implementation and monitoring of concrete actions to prevent, reduce, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence—physical, sexual, emotional and neglect.

Overview

  • The ten steps are: 1. Understand the problem; 2. Recognise people’s vulnerability and resilience; 3. Define protection instruments; 4. Create a prevention team; 5. Complete a risk assessment; 6. Develop policies and procedures; 7. Educate adults, youth and children; 8. Respond to disclosures of violence; 9. Meet the challenges; and 10. Maintain safe environments.
  • Definitions of Gender-Based Violence can be found on page 15 and page 22 highlights the importance of gender inequality as a key risk factor for violence.
  • Power, when it is misused is a key root cause or social determinant of violence. The relationship between power dynamics and gender is described on page 23. Inequality, harmful attitudes about gender, control, and misuse of power can combine to heighten the risk of gender-based violence. Sample statistics on gender-based violence can be found on page 28.
  • Protection instruments for the safety of women and girls such as the UN Convention on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) are listed on page 36.
  • A gender analysis is vital for any risk assessment and should focus on men, women, girls and boys. An overview of a gender analysis is provided on page 45.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Fairholm, J., Sing, G. (2011). Ten steps to creating safe environments: How organisations and communities can prevent, mitigate and respond to interpersonal violence. Canadian Red Cross. Pp. 2-99. Available from: http://www.redcross.ca/crc/documents/3-5-7-1_respected_2011_tensteps_english_c15_proof.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 4.39
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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South Asia Earthquake – Pakistan: Ensuring Gender Equity and Community Participation in Watsan Programme

South Asia Earthquake – Pakistan: Ensuring Gender Equity and Community Participation in Watsan Programme
Purpose

This case study looks at some of the activities and interventions that took place in communities affected by the earthquake in Banian Union Council in Battagram district, in northern Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province on 8 October, 2005.

Overview

Activities and interventions undertaken aimed to improve hygiene practices and behaviour while encouraging gender equity and community participation. They were based on the minimum SPHERE standards for emergencies and the Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) process. PHAST is a participatory approach that enables service providers to work with communities, helps people feel more confident and empowers them to make decisions on key hygiene practices and behaviour within the family and community.

Some of the challenges faced, in terms of providing sanitation facilities in Pakistan, were related to cultural practices. Lack of community consultation at the beginning of the intervention led to limited results. This situation radically changed when the community participation element was developed through the PHAST process.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audience: Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.97
Country: Global
Resource type: Case study

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Gender and HIV

Gender and HIV

Purpose

This briefing paper looks at the importance of gender within Red Cross programmes and services and provides some suggestions about how Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies might integrate gender into HIV programmes and strategies.

Overview

  • Suggestions for incorporating gender into HIV programme planning include:
  • Design interventions based on the different needs of men and women in the community;
  • Examining assumptions about how men and women might benefit from programmes;
  • Consult key people in the community. If not properly consulted, these key community figures may boycott the service, believing it to interfere with cultural practices;
  • Talk with women and men separately and use women to talk with women, particularly if they are uncomfortable talking about sex and contraception;
  • Use existing information and studies about gender differences to inform programmes;
  • Budget for activities and staff in order to gather, analyse and track information about gender.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers; Communications staff; National Society leadership

Reference: Australian Red Cross. Gender and HIV. Pp.1-8. Available from: http://www.redcross.org.au/gender-briefing-papers.aspx [Accessed: 19thSeptember 2015].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 8
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

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Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Integrating Gender and Diversity into Community Health – Guidance Note

Purpose

This note provides guidance on how to integrate gender and diversity considerations when applying the community-based health and first aid (CBHFA) approach, particularly in regard to health promotion and disease prevention, Mother, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH), non-communicable diseases (NCDs), violence prevention and urban health programmes.

It contains a number of case studies from Afghanistan, Honduras, Qatar and Ireland.

A checklist for designing gender and diversity-sensitive community health programmes can be found on p.17.

Overview

  • Most interventions related to MNCH and sexual and reproductive health focus primarily on improving women and adolescent girls’ knowledge of, and practices on, MNCH issues. However, in most societies, men often control household income and hold the decision-making powers in matters that affect MNCH. Interventions that aim to build communities’ resilience and achieve improvements in MNCH need to involve older people (men and women), religious leaders and more specifically men and boys given their familial and social roles within communities in order to improve MNCH outcomes.
  • The increase in and prevalence of NCDs represents a global health crisis. The inter-linkages between MNCH and the development of NCDs are becoming increasingly clear. NCDs are the leading cause of death among women worldwide, particularly during childbearing years. The four main NCD risk factors for women and men are: unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and excessive use of alcohol.
  • Violence is among the most prominent public health problems faced today. Besides being a leading cause of mortality, many of the millions of non-fatal injuries result in life-long disabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.73
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Audiovisual: Older People and Disaster Risk Management

Audiovisual: Older People and Disaster Risk Management

Purpose

Vietnam is one of the countries in the world most vulnerable to natural disasters. The country suffers from many disasters including floods, storms, tropical depressions, droughts and forest fires. This video looks at the challenges older people face in disasters.

Overview

  • In any disaster older people are among the most vulnerable. Many old people develop chronic illnesses such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and dementia. Many become disabled and dependent on help, and others become poorer and more isolated. These factors lessen the chance of survival for older people during disasters.
  • It is, however, not right to think of older people only as victims of disaster, they can also be resources. They are resourceful for their long experience, influence on decision-making and control of economic assets. Their knowledge of the pattern of disasters, traditional survival systems, appropriate technologies, and alternative medicines can be vital to the development of community coping strategies in and after crises.
  • The Red Cross tries to address the needs of older people in disasters in its Community Based Disaster Risk Management programme (CBDRM). It does this by involving them in all stages of the programme, from analysis to implementation. Involving them has led to positive changes in attitude, knowledge and practices of the community and leaders.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers

YouTube linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhJgQ_wOOko

Note: The video is in Vietnamese subtitled in English

Reference: Netherland Red Cross Veitnam (20 December 2011). Older People and Disaster Risk Management. Duration 12.17 minutes [Online]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhJgQ_wOOko [Accessed: 22nd July 2016].

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Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 47.8
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Awareness materials, Video

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Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Protecting Older People in Emergencies: Good Practice Guide

Purpose

This briefing draws on 14 field projects to highlight common challenges of supporting older people. Eleven of the case studies summarise the key challenges and most effective responses that the experts identified during their visits. The three remaining case studies – from Darfur, the Occupied Palestinian Territories and Zimbabwe – draw on HelpAge’s own work in the field.

All the case studies demonstrate practical approaches that will help agencies increase the age-friendliness of their programming and make sure older people play an active role in their responses.

The overall aim of this good practice guide is to communicate ‘what works’, within a range of contexts, in order to promote protection initiatives for older people in emergencies that are truly inclusive.

Overview

  • This guide focuses on working practice in the following areas of humanitarian response: accessible shelter and latrines; livelihood support; access to food and accurate registration; strengthening family and community structures; better use of disaggregated data; appropriate healthcare; and mainstreaming age across clusters.
  • The examples of good practices shown in the guide have two key common elements: consultation with older people themselves and an appreciation that older people can play a vital role in developing and implementing their own solutions to the challenges they face.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (2012). Protecting older people in emergencies: good practice guide. Pp. 3-8. Available from: http://www.globalprotectioncluster.org/_assets/files/tools_and_guidance/age_gender_diversity/HelpAge_Older_People_Best_Practices_EN.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Voices of Ethnic Minority Children – Participatory Video on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in Vietnam

Voices of Ethnic Minority Children – Participatory Video on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in Vietnam

Purpose

This publication introduces the Participatory Video (PV) methodology as a tool to amplify the voices of traditionally excluded groups who are greatly affected by disasters. The publication outlines the steps involved in carrying out the PV process held in Vietnam in late 2010. It also highlights the lessons learnt from the project and provides recommendations.

Overview

The PV was held with the participation of 12 children (six boys and six girls) from two communes – Thuan and A Ngo. The resulting films were to be used in those communes and in 10 additional Quang Tri communes that are part of the DIPECHO-funded project for community and government awareness and advocacy.

The PV methodology supports an empowering process whereby community members become drivers of change and are empowered to act on local knowledge by creating information videos that can help them prioritise and express their needs. The participatory video methodology involves awareness-raising, capacity-building and people-centred decision-making processes which can be built from the local level, to district, national and international levels.

Usage: Training, Learning from experience

Audience: Technical staff; Volunteers

Reference: Tamara Plush & Nguyen Trong Ninh. Voices of ethnic minority children: Participatory video on disaster risk reduction and climate change in Vietnam. Plan International in Vietnam, European Commission Humanitarian Aid. Pp. 1-10. Available from: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/26509_26509planparticipatoryvideoindrrpro.pdf [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.02
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Guidelines

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Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division: Toolkit for Practitioners

Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division: Toolkit for Practitioners

Purpose

The overall purpose of this toolkit is to explain to practitioners: what participatory tools are available for rapid market-problem diagnosis, socio-economic and gender targeting and, for each tool, how to use it, how to analyse the information and how to use the findings in designing, implementing and evaluating projects.

This toolkit should be used in conjunction with the sourcebook.

Overview

The toolkit is divided into three parts:

  • Diagnostic study tool: It is divided into two parts: the first section provides hands-on practitioners with an overview of the factors to consider in planning and implementing participatory gender and market linkage diagnostic studies and the second section presents Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) tools designed for rapid diagnosis of: (a) village-level marketing issues; (b) poverty-targeting issues and (c) gender issues
  • Stakeholder workshop tool: it has two main sections: stakeholder analysis tools; and tools for problem identification and participatory planning. The latter section also spells out procedures for selecting focal area representatives in a democratic and equitable way.
  • Gender and poverty-sensitive monitoring and evaluation (M&E) tool: focuses primarily on tools for participatory impact assessment. It has two parts: The first section presents factors to consider in planning and implementing rapid impact assessments; and the second section presents the impact assessment tools and discusses how to use them.
  • Gender-sensitive PRA templates can be found in the ‘Attachments’ towards the end of the report.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: IFAD, Gender Strengthening Programme for Eastern and Southern Africa Division. (November 2002). Gender strengthening programme for eastern and southern Africa division: Toolkit for practitioners. Pp. 1-182. Available from: http://www.ifad.org/gender/tools/gender/Toolkit.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: IFAD
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.01
Country: Global
Resource type: Toolkit

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Women, Gender and Disaster Risk Communication

Women, Gender and Disaster Risk Communication

Purpose

This note looks at the importance of gender in disaster risk communication. It provides a brief overview of Save the Children’s gender-targeted communication strategy in two Cuban communities.

Overview

  • Disaster risk communication and warnings miss the mark if overly-general and not informed by gender-aware risk assessments and community-driven preparedness. Disaster communication must be creative, sensitive to culture and context, and also gender-targeted, based on knowledge of how particular groups of women and men create, receive, interpret and exchange knowledge about hazards and disasters. Women must speak for themselves and be heard.
  • Women’s and men’s daily lives revolve around social networks, roles and relationships that make a difference to disaster risk communicators.
  • Men’s higher tolerance of risk calls for male-focused communication and awareness strategies. Gender norms shaping risk perception and risk tolerance may be a barrier to potentially life-saving information for boys, male youth and adult men about hazards to which they are especially exposed.
  • Gender-based and cultural barriers limit women’s access to vital information. The “digital divide” in access to, and control over, computers and the internet is still a barrier to reaching women in many parts of the world.

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Communication staff

Reference: Gender and Disaster Network. (October 2009). Women, gender and disaster risk communication. Gender Note #5. Pp. 1-4. Available from: https://www.gdnonline.org/resources/GDN_GenderNote5_RiskCommunication.pdf. [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

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Author: GDN
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.47
Country: Global
Resource type: Briefing paper, Report, Research

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