Beneficiary Communications and Accountability Baseline Assessment Grid (Tools) – Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development

Beneficiary Communications and Accountability Baseline Assessment Grid (Tools) – Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development

Purpose:

This document serves as a tool for assessing Beneficiary Communications and Accountability (BCA) in institutions.

Overview

The tool assesses:

  • Institutional knowledge, capacity and commitment: institutional and human and financial resources; level of information sharing with communities; and participation and community engagement (beneficiaries have an opportunity to influence programme decisions and provide feedback).
  • Emergency preparedness and response: preparedness activities; and response activities.
  • Priority areas for beneficiary communication support: interventions; and tools.
  • Country overview: demographics; health; disaster profile.
  • Media landscape: SMS, internet, radio, TV, word of mouth, newspapers, media partnerships.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation; monitoring and evaluation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (n.d.). Beneficiary Communications and Accountability (BCA) Baseline Assessment Grid. Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-10).

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Author: IFRC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.4
Country: Regional

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Beneficiary Communications and Accountability Baseline Assessment Grid (Benchmarks). Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development

Beneficiary Communications and Accountability Baseline Assessment Grid (Benchmarks). Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development

Purpose:

This document looks at institutional benchmarks in the conduct of BCA. It covers benchmarks for basic, intermediate, advanced and mature levels.

Overview:

Benchmarks covered include:

  • Institutional commitments and human and financial resources: organisations demonstrate political will and allocate appropriate human and financial resources to incorporate BCA into programmes.
  • Information sharing: tools and mechanisms are developed to increase beneficiaries’ capacity to make informed decisions and increase knowledge-sharing.
  • Participation: participatory structures are developed that improve beneficiary decision-making capacity on key aspects of programme delivery.
  • Feedback and complaints handling: a community-based complaints and response mechanism is developed to reduce the risk of fraud and abuse and ensure good quality programme delivery.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation; monitoring and evaluation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (n.d.). Beneficiary Communications and Accountability (BCA) Baseline Assessment Grid. Institutional Capacity for BCA in Response, Recovery and Development. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-6).

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Author: IFRC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.5
Country: Regional

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Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) Brochure in English and Burmese

Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) Brochure in English and Burmese

Purpose: Conduct advocacy sessions for local authorities and Red Cross branch to ensure their participation in implementation and support for sustainability.

Overview: Review disaster profiles, vulnerabilities, capacities of most vulnerable Village – Communities. 

Usage: Training.

Audience: Volunteers.

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.27
Country: Myanmar
Resource type: Brochure

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A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Purpose:

This guide has been developed to support Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and IFRC staff in more systematically integrating risk reduction measures into their planning. It describes in detail what key issues need to be considered, and when. The guidance aims at ensuring that risk reduction measures are taken into account in different sectors and contexts. It also details the key elements that need to be in place to create an enabling environment.

Overview:

  • General steps for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) are: DRR and CCA screening. The strategy, policy, programme or project in question must be first screened with a DRR and CCA lens, and then a detailed assessment made. If this shows that disaster and climate change risks have not been duly considered or addressed, then adjustments should be made to the planned activity. A monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework should also be developed. Mainstreaming DRR and CCA can be ensured only when the process is regularly monitored and evaluated.
  • The paper details six specific programming contexts (conflict, urban, reducing vulnerability, strengthening resilience, disaster preparedness, disaster response, and recovery) and key sectors (health and care; water, sanitation and hygiene; migration; shelter and settlement; livelihood and food security; natural resource management) for mainstreaming DRR and CCA. Each of these is accompanied by specific key principles of DRR and CCA mainstreaming, as well as good practice checklists. Aside from the context-specific guidance, there are two general principles: first, a National Society needs to ensure that it has adequate capacity at relevant levels to mainstream DRR and CCA; second, given that risk patterns change, risk should be monitored at least once per year. If changes in circumstances and risk are identified, programming choices and activities may need to be adapted to these changes.
  • A gender good practice checklist can be found on p.52.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2013). A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (pp. 1-62).

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Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Gender & Diversity in Asia Pacific

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practice in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts in Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • The capacity-building process involves communities identifying their needs, volunteers offering their time, staff coordinating resources, and domestic and international partners providing support where necessary. It ultimately helps the vulnerable better manage their lives, reduce the risks they face and improve their long-term health, well-being and livelihoods.
  • In Mongolia the Red Cross strives to ensure that the voices of groups such as the elderly, disabled and women-headed households, which will usually not be heard, are included in planning and branch activities.
  • In Nepal, involvement with Red Cross programmes have improved the lives of Nepalese women, especially in terms of challenges faced by them in the community, which limit their participation in discussions about decisions affecting them.
  • Many Cambodians have experienced social isolation, exclusion or discrimination in different forms as victims of the AIDS virus, war or sexual assault. The Red Cross empowers such people as volunteers to achieve new and appreciated roles in their communities.
  • In Australia, the Red Cross has increased its attention to the needs of groups who have been marginalised socially, economically and culturally.

Usage: Training; Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Volunteers, youth, technical staff

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Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Overview Tools for Gender Analysis

Purpose

This document provides an overview of tools required for gender analysis.

Overview

The tools are:

  • Sex-disaggregated data: For most gender assessments, separate data is needed for women and men. This is the foundation for the identification of societal differences between the sexes.
  • Gender impact assessment: This helps in identifying the impact of proposed measures on gender equality, and in countering any unintended effects on women or on men. It encourages gender equality in policy measures, improves the quality of the assessed policy as a whole and saves cost.
  • Gender equality audit: This helps to identify shortcomings, and strategies to overcome them. It also helps to motivate organisations to agree a set of gender equality targets and build gender-related capacity among staff.
  • Gender vulnerability assessment: Vulnerability should be assessed through the eyes of the vulnerable. Separate consultations with women may uncover gender-differentiated vulnerabilities and gender-sensitive adaptive responses.
  • Participatory methods: Actively strengthening participation of women and men in planning and public consultation is highly important. Very few policies are gender neutral.
  • Gender budgeting: The basic principle of gender budgeting is to connect two policy areas that used to be separated: gender inequality, and public finances and programmes.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Gender CC. (2012). Overview Tools for Gender Analysis. Pp.1-2. Available from:http://comm.gendercc.net/pluginfile.php/145/mod_resource/content/3/Table_Tools_for_Gender_Analysis.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Author: Gender CC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.50
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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A Pocket Guide to Gender and Diversity in Emergencies – Quality, Impact and Accountability

A Pocket Guide to Gender and Diversity in Emergencies – Quality, Impact and Accountability

Purpose

This pocket guide covers issues such as the basics of gender and diversity analysis, rapid gender and diversity assessment – the triple ‘A’ approach, gender-based violence, and the roles and responsibilities of different groups of people, ranging from the president and board members (national and branch level) to staff and volunteers. It also looks at the provision of shelter and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in emergency situations.

Overview

  • Disasters affect people from all walks of life. Often (in the early phase of an emergency) we name a number of “people” affected. But “people” comprise men, women, boys and girls. In order to implement a good quality, accountable emergency response – we must all have a basic understanding of who is affected and why.
  • The triple A approach looks at the assessment team; asking who, what and how; and analysing findings rapidly.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Volunteers

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies & The Vanuatu Red Cross Society. A pocket guide to gender and diversity in emergencies: Quality, impact and accountability. Pp.1-8.

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Author: IFRC
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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.69
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Organisational Gender Assessment Tool

Organisational Gender Assessment Tool

Purpose

This capacity-building tool is designed to enable National Societies become better placed to mainstream gender into policy and programming responses. The tool contains an assessment checklist and accompanying action plans.

Overview

  • The assessment checklist is a quick and effective way to determine the extent to which a National Society embraces and integrates gender into its core operations and programmes. It covers four areas: technical capacity; organisational culture; accountability; and political will.
  • There are four action plans to complete (one for each aspect of gender capacity and readiness). The action plans help to improve the capacity and readiness of a National Society to mainstream gender. The suggested steps that can be taken will depend on scores from the assessment checklist. Therefore, not all actions will be relevant to a National Society.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Monitoring and evaluation

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Australian Red Cross (27 September 2010). Organisational Gender Assessment. Australian Red Cross. Pp. 1-15. Available from: http://www.redcross.org.au/files/Organisational_Gender_Assessment.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Country: Regional

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