Report of assessment of household kits in emergency operations by Viet Nam Red Cross

Report of assessment of household kits in emergency operations by Viet Nam Red Cross

Purpose:

The “Assessment of the effectiveness of using household (HH) kit in relief activities of the VNRC” aims to:

  • Assess the effectiveness of HH kit used by VNRC in relief activities in recent years, which focus on assessing the relevance of the relief items in the HH kit and distribution method.
  • Propose adjustments for using HH kit in the relief activities by VNRC in Vietnam in the near future, which define the structure and form of relief items, HH kit container and distribution method.

Overview: 

Recommendations in the findings include:

  • VNRC to consider providing HH kits in emergency phase to households whose houses were burned, collapsed or swept way due to flood and lost all items.
  • Do not need to conduct beneficiary selection meeting for those special cases in order to conduct timely response for mass media right after the disaster happened; or need to conduct beneficiary selection meeting (where the households partly affected by disaster) during the time of shipping HH kit from the warehouse to affected place.
  • VNRC national headquarters need to transport HH kit to the regional warehouse or to a number of disaster-prone provinces having sufficient storage conditions. Allocate to provincial chapters to stockpile and purchase a certain amount of HH kit ready in their area (depending on local storage conditions and level of disaster).
  • Use agents with sufficient capacity to supply HH kits (already signed annual framework contracts) to ship HH kits directly to the affected areas.
  • The provincial chapters proactively develop plan and implement the PDRT to assess damage and needs with quality information in order to shorten the assessment time (no later than 3 days after the natural disasters occurred) and report promptly to the VNRC national headquarters. The provision and distribution of HH kits should take place within 10 days after the disaster occurred.

 

The report is available in both English [0.79 MB, pdf] and Vietnamese [0.77 MB, pdf]

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Document Data

Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.7
Country: Vietnam
Theme(s): Livelihood
Tagged in: Non-food items

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Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies

Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies

Purpose

The primary purpose of these guidelines is to enable humanitarian actors and communities to plan, establish, and coordinate a set of minimum multi-sectoral interventions to prevent and respond to sexual violence during the early phase of an emergency.

Overview

  • Three sets of activities are included in the guidelines: 1) overview of activities to be undertaken in the preparedness phase; 2) detailed implementation of minimum prevention and response during the early stages of the emergency; and 3) overview of comprehensive action to be taken in more stabilised phases and during recovery and rehabilitation.
  • The guidelines recommend specific key interventions for preventing and responding to gender-based violence in humanitarian emergencies. The matrix in Chapter 3 is an overview of recommended key interventions for preventing and responding to sexual violence, organised by the three general phases of emergencies: emergency preparedness; early phase (minimum prevention and response); and stabilised phase (comprehensive prevention and response).
  • The guideline also includes action sheets for minimum prevention and response: the action sheets are organised by sectors and cross-cutting functions. There are five cross-cutting functions that require action from multiple organisations and sectors. These are: coordination; assessment and monitoring; protection; human resources; and information education communication. In addition to the cross-cutting functions, there are specific interventions organised by sector: protection; water and sanitation; food security and nutrition; shelter and site planning and non-food items; health and community services; and education.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2005). Guidelines for Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies. Global Protection Cluster. Pp. 1-342. Available from: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2014_2019/documents/femm/dv/gbv_toolkit_book_01_20_2015_/gbv_toolkit_book_01_20_2015_en.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Document Data

Author: IASC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.84
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Purpose

This document systematically reviews the main risks older people are exposed to in emergency situations. For each risk, the document also lists simple measures that can be taken within the standard programming and funding parameters of humanitarian organisations to reduce risks for older people in emergencies.

Overview

The document identifies risks in nine categories:

  1. General concerns: worsening of pre-existing marginalisation and exclusion; invisibility to humanitarian actors.
  2. Protection: not being able to leave home or IDP/refugee camps even if one wants to; being separated from family or community; being a victim of abuse; having to care for children; having housing, land and properties rights ignored; and being excluded by communal shelters.
  3. Food: not being registered for this, and having difficulties reaching the food distribution point or market; having difficulties at the food distribution point; and transporting the food home; not receiving an equal share of food within the family; and having inappropriate food.
  4. Non-food items: not having enough warm clothes /blankets; or culturally acceptable clothes; and not being included in NFI distribution lists.
  5. Shelter: not being automatically given shelter by family; having inaccessible shelter; having to sleep on cold, hard or damp surfaces; not having proper gender separation; and being grouped with unknown people.
  6. WASH: not being included in and having difficulties reaching water distribution points; having difficulties transporting water back home; having difficulties reaching and using sanitation facilities; and having difficulties disposing of waste.
  7. Nutrition: having malnutrition unchecked and untreated.
  8. Health: being more subject to ill health or injury; having difficulties accessing health services; inappropriate health services; and difficulties accessing psychological support.
  9. Recovery: being excluded from rehabilitation and livelihood projects; and not being able to earn a living

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (May 2012). Older people in emergencies – Identifying and reducing risks. Pp. 2-13. Available from: http://www.helpage.org/silo/files/older-people-in-emergencies–identifying-and-reducing-risks.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Women, Girls, Boys and Men Different Needs – Equal Opportunities

Purpose

This handbook offers real and practical guidance on identifying and addressing the differing needs and situations of women, girls, boys and men; in other words, being sensitive to gender issues in humanitarian crises.

Overview

The handbook is divided into two sections:

  • Section A: This section includes four chapters covering the core principles, mandates, definitions and frameworks for gender equality: Basics of gender in emergencies sets out the overarching framework of gender equality programming in humanitarian action. It defines terms and explains the relevance of gender equality in crisis situations; International Legal Framework for Protection provides information on mandates coming from human rights, humanitarian and refugee law; Coordination on Gender Equality in Emergencies describes the elements of effective coordination and the establishment of gender networks in emergencies; Participation in Humanitarian Action discusses the importance of ensuring the equal participation of women, girls, boys and men in all aspects of humanitarian action, provides participation standards and gives examples on “how to” participate in a crisis.
  • Section B: This section provides sector and cluster-specific guidance. It covers the following areas: camp coordination and camp management; education; food issues; health; livelihoods; non-food items; registration; shelter; water, sanitation and hygiene. Each chapter is divided into: gender analysis; actions; checklist; and resources.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action. (December 2006). Women, girls, boys and men: Different needs – equal opportunities. Pp. 1-113.                                        Available from: https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Gender%20Handbook.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015].

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Document Data

Author: IASC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.33
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Minimum standard commitments to gender and diversity in emergency programming by sector

Minimum standard commitments to gender and diversity in emergency programming by sector

Purpose

This checklist provides a quick tool for assessing compliance with the Minimum Standard Commitments in Emergency Programming for Red Cross / Red Crescent staff and volunteers in: emergency health; food security; water, sanitation and hygiene; emergency shelter; livelihoods; non-food items and disaster risk reduction.  It serves as a tool for organisations to mark progress and identify their next steps.

Overview

The Minimum Standard  Commitments for each sector are based around a framework of: dignity; access; participation; safety; and internal protection systems. The checklist provides specific indicators which an organisation can use to rate its progress (achieved, partially achieved, not achieved and not applicable), justify its score and propose next steps.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.81
Country: Regional
Resource type: Policy

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Minimum Standard Commitments to Gender and Diversity in Emergency Programming – Pilot Version

Minimum Standard Commitments to Gender and Diversity in Emergency Programming – Pilot Version

Purpose

This checklist provides a quick tool for assessing compliance with the Minimum Standard Commitments in Emergency Programming for Red Cross / Red Crescent staff and volunteers in: emergency health; food security; water, sanitation and hygiene; emergency shelter; livelihoods; non-food items and disaster risk reduction.  It serves as a tool for organisations to mark progress and identify their next steps.

Overview

The Minimum Standard  Commitments for each sector are based around a framework of: dignity; access; participation; safety; and internal protection systems. The checklist provides specific indicators which an organisation can use to rate its progress (achieved, partially achieved, not achieved and not applicable), justify its score and propose next steps.

Important Note

This document is the key operational document for IFRC and Red Cross Red Crescent National Societies for gender and diversity. Over the past two years and  through the leadership of Gender and Diversity Focal Points in Southeast Asia, the Minimum Standard Commitments have been tested at national and regional level, through mainstreaming the in VCA processes, integration in NDRT & RDRT capacity building and deployments, emergency response, gender-based violence research, sensitisation on internal protection systems such as the Code of Conduct and Child Protection policy, and linking with Community Engagement and Accountability work in the region.

From these experiences, and experiences globally, it is time to revisit the standards and see where we can improve the guidance to ensure they continue to be practical and relevant! We very much encourage and welcome your comments to this guidance note through this google doc link. The guidance is split into key sectors: Health, Food Security, WASH, Emergency Shelter, Livelihoods, Non-food items and DRR, so please feel free to feedback on the sector you are most familiar with. The deadline for comments is 15th August 2017.

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

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