A Guide for Parliamentarians to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

A Guide for Parliamentarians to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

Purpose
This guide aims to familiarise parliamentarians with the Movement, particularly the role of the 187 Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies throughout the world. A strong and active National Society can do much to assist public authorities at all levels of government in the humanitarian field. There are a number of characteristics that distinguish a National Society from non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the United Nations (UN) and other elements of civil society. This guide is designed to provide information and understanding with a view to building on the existing strong and valuable relationships between parliamentarians and the National Society.

Overview
• What is the Movement?
• What does ‘auxiliary role’ mean?
• Examples of services that National Societies provide.
• What do I need to know about international humanitarian law (IHL), international disaster response law (IDRL) and other areas of disaster law?
• Why are the red cross, red crescent and red crystal emblems important?
• What is humanitarian diplomacy?
• What can you do as a parliamentarian to strengthen and support your National Society?

Usage: Policy development

Audience: National Society leadership

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.2
Country: Global
Resource type: Guidelines, Policy

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Staying on air to stay alert

Staying on air to stay alert

Seven public service announcements about the work of the Indonesian Red Cross (PMI) have been broadcast consecutively. They contain various information about the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement, health and disasters, all designed harmoniously with the culture of the land of Nanggroe, the alternative name for the province of Aceh.

Radio broadcasting was chosen as the media to convey messages as the people of Aceh are very familiar with radio broadcasting, given that it is easily accessible and in tune with people’s sense for entertainment. Thus, radio broadcasting was considered as a quick and cheap media messenger with a wide coverage.

With this concept in mind, PMI pioneered a radio program together with the Irish Red Cross in 2006 and named it Rumoh PMI Radio – meaning “PMI house”, in the sense of a common home. It was a means of spreading information during the rehabilitation and reconstruction period in Aceh, which was hit hard by the Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004. For more, read this link.

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Out of harm’s way: Injecting drug users and harm reduction (Advocacy report) 2010

Out of harm’s way: Injecting drug users and harm reduction (Advocacy report) 2010

Purpose:

This IFRC Health Advocacy Report depicts the stark reality of what it means to be an injecting drug user and living with HIV. It examines the prevention, treatment, care and support needs of this most at-risk population and the IFRC’s response to their plight. It also offers National Societies and the reader an advocacy tool that can be used for years to come. The aim? To remind governments and National Societies of the obligation to respect the human rights of injecting drug users at risk of, or living with, HIV. Although our focus is global, we place a special emphasis on Eastern Europe and Central Asia where the situation is becoming increasingly dire.

Overview:

  • Part 1: we discuss about the magnitude of the problem with an at-a-glance situation analysis.
  • Part 2: we outline our advocacy messages that address the inhumane conditions injecting drug users and their families all too often find themselves trapped in—gravely ill, stigmatized and alone.
  • Part 3: we summarize the Red Cross and Red Crescent’s harm reduction response which is based on the 2003 ‘Spreading the light of science’ guidelines on injecting drug use.
  • Part 4: we explore how all stakeholders can work together to adjust policies, establish programmes and reduce harm among some of the world’s most disenfranchised and disadvantaged populations.

 

Summary:

  • Harm reduction refers to a range of pragmatic and evidence-based public health policies and practices aimed at reducing the negative consequences associated with drug use and other related risk factors such as HIV and AIDS. These interventions exemplify human rights in action by seeking to alleviate hazards faced by the injecting drug users, where needed, without distinction and without judgement. The IFRC advocates harm reduction for one very simple reason: It works.
  • The United Nations estimates that approximately 15.9 million people living in 148 countries regularly inject drugs. Known as injecting drug users, these individuals are particularly vulnerable to HIV, Hepatitis C and B infections owing to risky behaviours such as sharing syringes and needles, unsafe sex practices and a general lack of health-seeking behaviour. Worldwide, an estimated three million injecting drug users are now living with HIV.
  • Injecting drug use thus constitutes a serious public health concern that can only be addressed through the rational application of nonmoralistic public health interventions that emphasize harm reduction programming over punishment and censure.
  • In this context, the IFRC recommends that scientific evidence and a humanitarian spirit should guide the HIV response. Injecting drug users, who routinely face harassment, stigmatization, violence and social exclusion, require not only care but compassion as well. Stigma only further marginalizes already vulnerable individuals and directly impedes efforts to halt the spread of HIV. Reducing marginalization also reduces the transmission of HIV and other infectious diseases.

 

Usage: Advocacy tool

Audience:  National Society staff and volunteers

See alsoGuidelines on harm reduction related to injecting drug use: Spreading the light of science

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date: December 1, 2010
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.2
Country: Global
Resource type: Guidelines, Report

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Beneficiary Communication Background paper for the workshop 2013 – Community Engagement

Beneficiary Communication Background paper for the workshop 2013 – Community Engagement

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Word Size (MB): Size: 0.239
Country: Global
Resource type: Briefing paper

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4th Asia-Pacific Communications Forum | 14-16 March 2016 | Seoul, Korea

4th Asia-Pacific Communications Forum | 14-16 March 2016 | Seoul, Korea

The 3-day Forum was hosted by the Korean Red Cross and co-organised by IFRC and ICRC in Seoul. Under the theme of ‘Communicating in the Digital Space’, the event brought together communications  colleagues from NS, IFRC and ICRC offices from across 23 countries spanning SE Asia, East Asia, South Asia and the Pacific. Colleagues from IFRC Geneva and the Global Disaster Preparedness Center also participated.

The focus was on using social media for saving lives and changing minds – via plenary sessions and skills labs which looked at a wide range of applications, including using social media for disaster response, community awareness & education around preparedness, advocacy and campaigns, fundraising, connecting with media, “big data” and deepened community engagement.

The programme included  external speakers from media organizations including  Rappler, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, UN Global Pulse, Greenpeace, AFP and more. We livestreamed many sessions using Periscope and some recorded versions will be available soon on the FedNet page we created (you will also find relevant resources and links here): https://fednet.ifrc.org/en/newsevents/events/movement-meetings/asia-pacific-events/4th-asia-pacific-communications-forum/

A set of collective commitments by participants, focusing on use of social media, was drafted and is currently being reviewed. A report on the Forum will also be produced and circulated.

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See the concept note | agenda | participant list | report | Seoul Commitments | for more info (see FedNet link)

A quick snapshot of the Twitter engagement for the event, based on the hashtag #RC21C

Rappler CEO Maria Ressa speaking at the Forum| Korean Red Cross representative  | IFRC Indonesia Delegation representative

Statistics on the use of digital media in Asia Pacific, see this link in slideshare                                 |                          Tweetreach snapshot for #RC21C as of March 17, 2016

 

 

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