“I see that it is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings

“I see that it is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings

Purpose

This report documents the key findings and lessons learned from a project the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and the Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) conducted to identify the barriers that people with disabilities face in accessing programmes and services designed to prevent and respond to GBV, and to pilot and evaluate solutions for promoting disability inclusion in Gender-Based Violence (GBV) programmes in conflict-affected settings. It concludes with practical recommendations for a range of humanitarian actors, governments and donors to improve disability inclusion in GBV programming in humanitarian settings.

The project was conducted in conflict-affected communities in Burundi, Ethiopia, Jordan and the Northern Caucasus in the Russian Federation.

Overview

  • Negative attitudes and discrimination by GBV service providers, family and community members prevented access to GBV prevention activities and response services.
  • Inadequate transportation to activity locations and service centres, and lack of use of appropriate communication approaches by GBV practitioners, particularly for people who are deaf or with intellectual disabilities, also served as a barrier to access and participation.
  • Caregivers of persons with disabilities report being excluded from activities as a result of being unable to leave the people they care for.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Parts of this report: the full report, 2-pager summary and toolkit

Reference: Women’s Refugee Commission (May 2015). “I see that It Is Possible” Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in Gender-Based Violence Programming in Humanitarian Settings. Pp.1-41. Available from: https://www.womensrefugeecommission.org/resources/document/945-building-capacity-for-disability-inclusion-in-gender-based-violence-gbv-programming-in-humanitarian-settings-overview [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.13
Country: Global, Regional

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Older People in Disasters and Humanitarian Crises: Guidelines for Best Practices

Older People in Disasters and Humanitarian Crises: Guidelines for Best Practices

Purpose

The guidelines in this document give examples of key approaches and actions that could help the humanitarian community reduce the vulnerability associated with ageing. They also suggest ways to enhance the capacities and contribution of older people in emergencies.

The guidelines also explore the wider issues relating to older people in humanitarian crises. These range from globally agreed principles of social and civil practice and global demographic changes, to the physical impact of the ageing process, common images and assumptions held about older people, the key problems they face, and the gender dimensions of their needs.

Overview

  • The guidelines include: addressing older people’s needs; meeting basic needs; mobility; equal access to essential services; social, psychosocial and family needs; and recognise and support the contributions of older people.
  • Sample checklists to assess older people’s needs in emergencies are shown in pp. 22-24.

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (2008). Older people in disaster and humanitarian crises: Guideline for best practices. Pp 1-25. Available from: http://www.helpage.org/silo/files/older-people-in-disasters-and-humanitairan-crises-guidelines-for-best-practice.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.53
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Older People in Emergencies – Identifying and Reducing Risks

Purpose

This document systematically reviews the main risks older people are exposed to in emergency situations. For each risk, the document also lists simple measures that can be taken within the standard programming and funding parameters of humanitarian organisations to reduce risks for older people in emergencies.

Overview

The document identifies risks in nine categories:

  1. General concerns: worsening of pre-existing marginalisation and exclusion; invisibility to humanitarian actors.
  2. Protection: not being able to leave home or IDP/refugee camps even if one wants to; being separated from family or community; being a victim of abuse; having to care for children; having housing, land and properties rights ignored; and being excluded by communal shelters.
  3. Food: not being registered for this, and having difficulties reaching the food distribution point or market; having difficulties at the food distribution point; and transporting the food home; not receiving an equal share of food within the family; and having inappropriate food.
  4. Non-food items: not having enough warm clothes /blankets; or culturally acceptable clothes; and not being included in NFI distribution lists.
  5. Shelter: not being automatically given shelter by family; having inaccessible shelter; having to sleep on cold, hard or damp surfaces; not having proper gender separation; and being grouped with unknown people.
  6. WASH: not being included in and having difficulties reaching water distribution points; having difficulties transporting water back home; having difficulties reaching and using sanitation facilities; and having difficulties disposing of waste.
  7. Nutrition: having malnutrition unchecked and untreated.
  8. Health: being more subject to ill health or injury; having difficulties accessing health services; inappropriate health services; and difficulties accessing psychological support.
  9. Recovery: being excluded from rehabilitation and livelihood projects; and not being able to earn a living

 

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: HelpAge International (May 2012). Older people in emergencies – Identifying and reducing risks. Pp. 2-13. Available from: http://www.helpage.org/silo/files/older-people-in-emergencies–identifying-and-reducing-risks.pdf [Accessed: 21st September 2016]

 

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Disability Checklist for Emergency Response: Adapted from Disability Task Force

Disability Checklist for Emergency Response: Adapted from Disability Task Force

Purpose

This document provides a checklist of activities which ensure the inclusion and protection of injured and disabled people during emergencies. As well as general guidelines, it provides specific ones for: health and nutrition; water and sanitation; protection, women and children with disabilities; reconstruction and shelter; livelihoods; and education.

Overview

  • People with disabilities and injuries may not have access to the same health services or food distribution, even though they have the same, if not more, need than others. This can be due to various reasons including lack of mobility to reach food distribution site, or lack of awareness of communication messages.
  • Access to water and sanitation (WatSan) facilities are basic needs of all people with injuries and disabilities. Access to these facilities should be promoted through physical accessibility as well as a positive attitude towards encouraging people with injuries / disabilities to use them.
  • People with injuries / disabilities are especially vulnerable to physical, sexual and emotional abuse and may require additional protection. This should be included in reconstruction plans so as to improve access to shelters, schools, community health centres and other public buildings.
  • By contributing to the family income, people with disabilities can reduce their economic reliance on their family and enable the family recover from the economic effects of the disaster as soon as possible. Efforts should also be made to ensure that all children in every village start / re-start / continue going to school.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Handicap International. Disability checklist for emergency response: Adapted from disability task force. Pp.1-9. Available from:http://www.handicap-international.de/fileadmin/redaktion/pdf/disability_checklist_booklet_01.pdf [Accessed: 20th September 2015]

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.88
Country: Regional
Resource type: Checklist

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