Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide

Purpose

This guide gives suggestions on how to address gender and women’s empowerment in climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR) projects, or projects which have integrated climate change and DRR considerations.

Overview

Three steps are involved in conducting a gender analysis:

  • Analyse the broader context: This includes exploring gender and sex-disaggregated secondary data; mapping policies and laws related to human rights and gender policies, and commitments and implementation of Conventions such as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW); investigating wider cultural norms, values and practices related to gender (for example, expectations of how individuals should act, or customs related to marriage).
  • Select and investigate key areas: investigating key areas related to the type of intervention being designed or implemented; exploring these areas through review of secondary data and exercises with participants and stakeholders; paying attention to the individual, relational and structural levels.
  • Prioritise practical and strategic gender issues: identifying practical issues which involve addressing immediate gender issues and needs, such as providing financial training for women business owners so that they may improve their income. Practical needs should be addressed in order to ensure the equal and sustainable impact of projects. It is also important to identify strategic factors, such as laws or social norms, which must be tackled in order to transform unequal gender relations in the long-term. If strategic factors are ignored, practical solutions are likely to have minimal sustainable impact.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Coulier, M. & Konstantinidis, D. (June 2015). Making it Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-To Guide. Care International in Vietnam (pp. 1-101). Available from: http://careclimatechange.org/tool-kits/making-it-count-integrating-gender/ [Accessed: 23 December 2015]

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Flood Early Warning Systems in Nepal – A Gendered Perspective

Purpose

For flood early-warning systems to be fully effective, they must reach the end users and meet the different needs of women and men. Thus, a study on ‘Early warning systems from a gender perspective, with special reference to flood hazards’ was conducted in four countries as a part of the Hindu Kush Himalayan-Hydrological Cycle Observing System (HKH-HYCOS) project.

This report presents the methodology and findings of the study in Nepal.

Overview

  •  The study has improved understanding of the existing flood early warning systems in Nepal, and suggests ways to make early warning systems more effective and responsive to the needs of vulnerable groups, and women in particular. The report suggests that, in view of the diversity of development issues and livelihood challenges that communities face on a day-to-day basis, it is important to tune early warning systems according to the local context.
  • Gender inclusion in early warning systems tends to be limited to risk assessment and the participation of women in community groups and capacity building and training. Sensitisation on the development of gender-sensitive tools in early warning systems, including gender-sensitive risk assessment, gender-sensitive mechanisms for disseminating and receiving alerts, and response capacity-building of women and girls, is needed in order to make early warning systems in the country gender-sensitive and thus more effective.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff

Reference: Shrestha, MS., Kafle, S., Gurung, M., Nibanupudi, HK., Khadgi, VR. & Rajkarnikar, G. (2014) Flood early warning systems in Nepal: A gendered perspective. ICIMOD Working Paper 2014/4. Kathmandu: ICIMOD. Pp.-1-66. Available from:http://lib.icimod.org/record/29959/files/Flood_EWS.pdf. [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

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Download: https://www.rcrc-resilience-southeastasia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Flood_EWS.pdf