Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit

Purpose

This toolkit introduces the European Commission’s new Gender-Age Marker for humanitarian action. It provides an overview of the tool and its application, as well as guidance on how to integrate gender and age concerns in humanitarian action and on how to apply the marker to humanitarian projects.

Overview

The Gender-Age Marker uses four criteria to assess how strongly humanitarian actions integrate gender and age considerations: gender and age analysis / SADD; adapted assistance; negative effects; and adequate participation.

  • Chapter 1 on the operational importance of gender and age presents arguments and examples demonstrating that humanitarian aid is of higher quality and more effective if it integrates issues relating to gender and age.
  • Chapter 2 provides tip sheets on integrating gender and age in humanitarian actions to support humanitarian workers in making their actions more sensitive to gender and age issues.
  • Chapter 3 provides detailed guidance on how to use the Gender-Age Marker in humanitarian actions.
  • Chapter 4 provides guidance on how to deal with difficult cases when using the Gender-Age Marker. For instance what to do if: only one dimension (age or gender) is well reflected; another important diversity dimension is missing; the context makes it difficult to integrate gender and age; the partner has made progress but still does not meet the criteria; the action is heterogeneous; there are no potential negative effects; different age brackets are used to report beneficiary data.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Steets, J., Binder, A. & Foran, S. (2013). Gender-Age Marker. Toolkit. European Commission (pp. 1-83). Available from: http://ec.europa.eu/echo/files/policies/sectoral/gender_age_marker_toolkit.pdf [Accessed 8 January 2016].

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.886
Country: Regional

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Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA)

Purpose

This document is an evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA) being carried out in 20 communes in Vietnam. The evaluation focuses on how VCA is managed to include vulnerable groups such as people with disability (PWD), the elderly, women and children, and how VCA can be adjusted to developments such as climate change adaptation and urbanisation. It also looks at the effectiveness of the VCA for local disaster risk reduction planning.

The study also looks into the differences and comparative advantages and disadvantages of CBDRA with the objective of informing the implementation by the Vietnam Red Cross Society (VNRC) of its own VCA, and its supporting role to the government CBDRA.

Overview

  • The evaluation shows that VNRC’s VCA capacity is in need of maintenance. To ensure that the VCAs have a meaningful contribution to effective local community risk reduction planning, the following areas need attention: meaningful inclusion of vulnerable groups through better facilitation; better data analysis and reporting; and follow-up on VCA results at different levels. In addition, VNRC needs a better system to maintain and develop its pool of trainers.
  • VNRC should recognise that, even if it decided to adopt the CBDRA, it would likely keep a core position in community assessments in Vietnam, as its support would be indispensable to the Vietnamese government in implementing the CBDRA.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

For Vietnamese version, click here Tiếng Việt, size 3 MB.

Citation: Hoa, N. T. P. & Miltenburg, M. (October 2015). Participatory Evaluation of the Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (VCA) and Comparative Analysis with the Community Based Disaster Risk Assessment (CBDRA). International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-109).

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Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia

Purpose

This manual serves to equip the Canadian Red Cross team with the knowledge and tools to act as trainers for their partners and community-based organisations/associations/committees constituted as part of their programme.

The manual has six units which are to be treated as sessions. The lessons in each unit are sub-sessions, and where required each lesson is further divided into topics.

Overview

A trainer’s guide containing guidelines on how to deliver training can be found on p.6 of the document.

  • Unit 1 provides a broad overview of ageing at global and national levels and helps to get an insight into the need for mainstreaming age friendliness.
  • Unit 2 focuses on mobilising older people of the community.
  • Unit 3 lists a few means to understand the vulnerabilities of older people and also to tap into their capacities so that they can contribute to the overall welfare of the community.
  • Unit 4 provides a detailed overview of the different dynamics that affect older people in disasters.
  • Unit 5 focuses on the various dynamics associated with older women and older people with disabilities.
  • Unit 6 provides tools to assess age friendliness of a project, older people’s involvement in community based-organisations, capturing impact on older people, and tips to include older people in impact-monitoring and/or an evaluation process.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Canadian Red Cross, HelpAge International. Integrating older people: A training of trainers manual for successful mainstreaming of age friendliness in Canadian Red Cross’ programme in Aceh, Indonesia. . Pp. 1-96.

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional

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Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practices in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts from Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • To start a participatory planning process a local Red Cross/Red Crescent branch should organise a discussion with vulnerable groups. This should include local government and other organisations that can meet some of the needs of the people. From these discussions come ideas for services, offers for community help such as volunteers and locally raised funds. Once a programme is designed and implemented with community participation, the community should give regular feedback to the Red Cross/Red Crescent to ensure that the service meets their needs or to suggest how it could be improved.
  • In deciding its role to support the supply of clean drinking water, and other basic schemes, the Nepal Red Cross ensured that it closely consulted affected communities.
  • In Cambodia, where flood, drought, storm and fire are the most frequent natural disasters, the Red Cross uses participatory planning with communities affected by regular disasters to strengthen community capacities.
  • The Red Cross in Mongolia set up volunteer councils as a new way to listen to the needs of specific groups of people such as the youth, elderly and disabled.
  • In Australia the Red Cross decided to find ways to work with young people, to understand better their needs and vulnerabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Youth

The video could be accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bft-_gKvt8

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.63
Country: Global, Regional

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Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Purpose

This study’s overall objective is to provide information on the collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD), and gender and generational analyses of SADD. It is intended to inform assessment processes by humanitarian actors responding to natural disasters and situations of armed conflict.

Overview

  • The document focuses on five clusters (education, emergency shelter, food security, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)). Within each cluster, it presents information from the published literature on how gender and age matter within these sectors for people living in crises caused by natural disaster and armed conflict. It then draws on interviews and published literature to examine if SADD is collected by UN lead cluster agencies, their partners and local agencies operating within these clusters and if so what, if any, difference it makes for programming.
  • Collection and use of SADD and gender and generational analyses enable operational agencies to deliver assistance more effectively and efficiently than without those data and findings, as illustrated by case studies and examples.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Dyan Mazurana, Prisca Benelli, Huma Gupta and Peter Walker, “Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies.” Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, August 2011.

 

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Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Purpose

This document outlines four criteria for assessing project/programme plans.  The criteria might not be applicable to projects that do not deal directly with populations affected by crisis or at risk.

Overview

The four criteria are:

  • Gender and diversity analysis and sex- and age-disaggregated data: how does the project take into consideration differences between girls, boys, women and men of different age groups in terms of their roles, responsibilities and control over resources, including their level of access to assistance; effects of the crisis or risk; capacities for coping with, responding to, recovering from and preparing for crises; and specific needs expectations and constraints?
  • Adapted assistance/services: what measures are taken to ensure that assistance and services provided by the project are accessible, affordable, acceptable and appropriate to gender and diversity concerns?
  • Negative effects: are potential negative effects of the project/programme on sex/age and diverse groups identified and prevented or mitigated?
  • Adequate participation of vulnerable and at-risk groups: how are sex/age and diverse groups consulted, informed and integrated in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project?

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Norwegian Red Cross (20 January 2015). Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3. Pp.2-69.  Available from: https://www.rodekors.no/Global/HK%20-%20Hovedkontoret/Internasjonal/Dokumenter/Gender/Final%20report,%20NorCross%20Gender%20Plan%20of%20Action%202009-2014.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Guidance on Including Older People in Emergency Shelter Programmes

Guidance on Including Older People in Emergency Shelter Programmes

Purpose

These guidelines recommend five key action points for including older people in shelter programmes.

Overview

Understand the needs and capacities of older people: programme staff must be aware of the importance of collecting data on older people. They should be aware of issues such as demographic change, international commitments, good practice and lessons learned from other projects on the vulnerabilities and contributions of older people.

Ensure that older people participate and are represented: an age-friendly shelter programme provides older people with choices about how to live, chances to participate in society, and the ability to live in a community where their needs can be addressed affordably.

Target vulnerable older people: focus on older men and women who are single, isolated or abandoned; are caring for children; are the main family breadwinners; living with chronic diseases, disability, or mobility or mental health problems; belong to the “oldest old” group; older widows; older men and women who rank as the poorest.

Incorporate age-friendly features in both household and community shelters: to build suitable shelters for older people, a blend of modern technology and traditional preferences is recommended. To ensure that the technical requirements are met, adhere to national and international standards for durable and environmentally-friendly shelter construction

Promote coordination, cooperation and sharing: to ensure that older people’s issues are not neglected or forgotten, it is crucial to include older people, along with other vulnerable groups, on the agenda of shelter cluster meetings.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

A two-page summary of these guidelines is also available at this link.

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Document Data

Publication date: January 1, 2011
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.16
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Audio Visual: AIDS and the Impact on Older People

Audio Visual: AIDS and the Impact on Older People

Purpose

This video looks at the impact HIV/AIDS has on older people.

Overview

  • Most HIV campaigns tend to focus on the young, neglecting older people.
  • The video illustrates the stories of two people in Zimbabwe suffering from the disease and its accompanying challenges. Individuals suffering from the disease are usually abandoned by their friends and families.

Usage: Learning from experience, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers

YouTube linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKaZX3vqEaU

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 10
Country: Global
Tagged in: Elderly, HIV/AIDS

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Eliminating Health Inequities – Every Woman and Every Child Counts

Eliminating Health Inequities – Every Woman and Every Child Counts

Purpose

This report provides evidence that health inequities can, and need to be, addressed through a holistic approach.

It contains a number of case studies from Egypt, Bangladesh, Malawi, Ecuador, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Austria.

Overview

  • Health inequities, and the resulting social injustice, are closely linked with other issues such as poverty, gender inequality and human rights violations which, in turn, have an impact on education, transport, health, agriculture, and overall well-being. Interventions should therefore be multi-sectoral, going beyond health to address social and economic determinants such as malnutrition, alcohol abuse, poor housing, indoor air pollution and poverty.
  • Women and children are the focus of attention for three reasons: 1. Women are more likely to face health inequities because their biological make-up demands more care. Pregnancy and childbirth are life events that expose women to greater risks; 2. Women are the gateway to improving the health of an entire population, starting with their children and members of their households; 3. The burden of caring for sick children and the elderly mainly falls on mothers and other female carers.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.76
Country: Global, Regional
Tagged in: Children, Elderly, Youth
Resource type: Report, Research

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Audiovisual: Older People and Disaster Risk Management

Audiovisual: Older People and Disaster Risk Management

Purpose

Vietnam is one of the countries in the world most vulnerable to natural disasters. The country suffers from many disasters including floods, storms, tropical depressions, droughts and forest fires. This video looks at the challenges older people face in disasters.

Overview

  • In any disaster older people are among the most vulnerable. Many old people develop chronic illnesses such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and dementia. Many become disabled and dependent on help, and others become poorer and more isolated. These factors lessen the chance of survival for older people during disasters.
  • It is, however, not right to think of older people only as victims of disaster, they can also be resources. They are resourceful for their long experience, influence on decision-making and control of economic assets. Their knowledge of the pattern of disasters, traditional survival systems, appropriate technologies, and alternative medicines can be vital to the development of community coping strategies in and after crises.
  • The Red Cross tries to address the needs of older people in disasters in its Community Based Disaster Risk Management programme (CBDRM). It does this by involving them in all stages of the programme, from analysis to implementation. Involving them has led to positive changes in attitude, knowledge and practices of the community and leaders.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Volunteers

YouTube linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhJgQ_wOOko

Note: The video is in Vietnamese subtitled in English

Reference: Netherland Red Cross Veitnam (20 December 2011). Older People and Disaster Risk Management. Duration 12.17 minutes [Online]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhJgQ_wOOko [Accessed: 22nd July 2016].

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Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 47.8
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Awareness materials, Video

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