What Works in Addressing Violence against Women and Girls: Lessons Learned from Typhoon Haiyan

What Works in Addressing Violence against Women and Girls: Lessons Learned from Typhoon Haiyan

Purpose

This document summarises the recommendations and discussions from a workshop hosted by the Department for International Development (DFID) on 9 June 2014. The purpose of the workshop was to build consensus on what did and didn’t work to help prevent and respond to violence against women and girls in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan hit in November 2013.

Overview

Recommendations from the workshop are:

The Gender Based Violence (GBV) sub-cluster should engage with the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) to regain ground on including protection/GBV questions in early assessments for future responses

The GBV sub-cluster should prioritise sustained field presence for its surge staff, rather than the meeting of bureaucratic benchmarks at national level; in this case the deadlines for the new ‘Level 3’ commitments absorbed a lot of surge resources.

At the same time, the sub-cluster and the protection/GBV community should shift efforts towards practical support to mainstreaming. Surge staff at the field level could give direct mainstreaming support to sectoral clusters, and the use of revised tools that are shorter and more pragmatic (such as checklist-style) should support this.

International implementing organisations, particularly international NGOs, should take on more of a role to connect local civil society organisations with the international community’s coordination structures and international protection/GBV actors. This could be as simple as accompanying local partners to cluster meetings, or as involved as providing consistent training on coordination structures.

Disaster preparedness in the high-risk Philippines is vital, and greater attention to protection, as part of preparedness investments, should be paid by organisations with a long-term presence in the country (which covers many UN agencies, Red Cross/Red Crescent, and international NGOs). Where the government is delivering this already, agencies and donors should give funding support.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners, Disaster preparedness

Reference: DFID (June 2015). What Works in Addressing Violence against Women and Girls: Lessons Learned from Typhoon Haiyan. Workshop Report(pp. 1-14). Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/what-works-in-addressing-violence-against-women-and-girls[Accessed: 26 December 2015].

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Document Data

Author: DFID, UKAid
Publication date: June 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.514

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Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji

Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji

Purpose

This toolkit seeks to: raise awareness on violence against women using a human rights-based approach, increase understanding of the barriers faced by women and girls with disabilities that experience violence, and show people how they can assist in the elimination of violence against women.

This toolkit contains five modules with facilitator notes, additional information and worksheets to run the sessions. It also contains checklists that can be used in programme assessment and planning for disability inclusion. The modules cover: human rights; disability; gender; violence against women and girls with disabilities; and action planning for inclusion.

Overview

  • Types of violence include: physical violence; sexual violence; social- economic violence; and emotional violence. The consequences of violence are long-lasting, reach into all aspects of women’s lives, and can include permanent disability or death through homicide, suicide or through reduced life expectancy due to illness. While emotional violence is often considered ‘not serious’ or ‘normal’, the consequences are serious and long-lasting.
  • Domestic violence occurs because men feel entitlement over women and because the community does not value women and men equally. This difference in status is the root cause of domestic violence.
  • Appendix 1 contains a disability inclusive practice checklist.

Usage: Training

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Pacific Disability Forum (PDF) (2014). Toolkit on Eliminating Violence against Women and Girls with Disabilities In Fiji (pp. 1-170). Available from: http://www.pacificdisability.org/getattachment/Resources/PDF-Resources/Toolkit-on-Eliminating-Violence-Against-Women-And-Girls-With-Disabilities-In-Fiji-(1).pdf.aspx [Accessed 8 January 2016].

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.2
Country: Fiji
Resource type: Toolkit, Training materials

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Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework

Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework

Purpose

In October 2013, White Ribbon began coordinating a National Community of Practice composed of organisations with projects funded by Status of Women Canada’s ‘Working Together: Engaging Communities To End Violence Against Women And Girls’. The Community of Practice focused on sharing lessons learned, challenges and enabling factors in engaging men and boys to help prevent gender-based violence.

One of the three main activities was the development of a National Evaluation Framework (NEF) to identify shared results across programmes and provide an evaluation resource tool for others in the gender-based violence prevention sector.

Overview

The process of change involved in engaging men and boys in GBV prevention includes three main elements: the context, the outcomes as they relate to the dimensions of change and the longer-term objective of sustainability (p. 10).

NEF measures change at four levels: the community, organisational, social and individual level.

In order to create sustainable change, capacity needs to be built at four levels: with individual men and boys; within male networks and relationships; the organisations that are committed to doing this work; and the community’s capacity to respond to and support GBV prevention initiatives.

Expected outcomes from the NEF include: awareness-raising; knowledge and understanding; attitudinal change; skill development; behavioural change; gender equitable peer interaction and support; partnerships and coalition building; advocacy for gender-based violence prevention.

Usage: Policy guidance

Audiences: Technical staff, Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: National Community of Practice & White Ribbon Canada (2015). Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework (pp. 1-20). Available at: http://whiteribbon.ca/pdfs/NEF_CoP.pdf [Accessed 8 January]

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Author: White Ribbon
Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.847
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Ending Violence against Women: A Guide to Working with Volunteers

Ending Violence against Women: A Guide to Working with Volunteers

Purpose

The overall objective of this manual is to provide guidance to organisational staff that work with, or want to work with, volunteers to end violence against women/girls (EVAW/G).

The manual has been designed to equip organisational staff with knowledge and methods to enable them to develop their volunteer programmes, and is divided into five sections.

Overview

  • Community volunteers are essential for NGO programmes on GBV because they are the primary means of implementing these organisations’ projects.
  • Volunteers allow NGOs to reach more remote areas, university campuses and other project areas.
  • Most volunteers face continuing challenges, such as lack of support from the community; lack of resources, experience, capacity, safety concerns; and working with the local authorities.
  • Volunteers require additional training, financial and transportation support, and safety and psychosocial support.
  • Volunteers, organisations and survivors of violence are generally satisfied with these programmes: volunteers enjoy the recognition, knowledge, experience and self-growth they gain; organisations appreciate the cost-effectiveness and ability to reach otherwise inaccessible communities; and survivors benefit from the volunteers’ work in their communities.
  • Volunteers’ understanding of gender and gender-based violence is quite limited. Stereotypical gender roles were widely reinforced by all stakeholders.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners; Technical staff

Reference: Rudge, V. (2015). Ending Violence against Women: A Guide to Working with Volunteers. Pp.3-75. Available from: http://www2.unwomen.org/~/media/field%20office%20eseasia/docs/publications/2015/03/un-w-volunteer-manual-revised2015.pdf?v=1&d=20150303T020056 [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

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Author: UN Women
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 8
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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