Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Audio Visual: Building Capacities – Participatory Planning

Purpose

This video is one of five documentaries created to illustrate best practices in building community and Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity in a variety of cultural contexts from Mongolia, Australia, Nepal and Cambodia.

Overview

  • To start a participatory planning process a local Red Cross/Red Crescent branch should organise a discussion with vulnerable groups. This should include local government and other organisations that can meet some of the needs of the people. From these discussions come ideas for services, offers for community help such as volunteers and locally raised funds. Once a programme is designed and implemented with community participation, the community should give regular feedback to the Red Cross/Red Crescent to ensure that the service meets their needs or to suggest how it could be improved.
  • In deciding its role to support the supply of clean drinking water, and other basic schemes, the Nepal Red Cross ensured that it closely consulted affected communities.
  • In Cambodia, where flood, drought, storm and fire are the most frequent natural disasters, the Red Cross uses participatory planning with communities affected by regular disasters to strengthen community capacities.
  • The Red Cross in Mongolia set up volunteer councils as a new way to listen to the needs of specific groups of people such as the youth, elderly and disabled.
  • In Australia the Red Cross decided to find ways to work with young people, to understand better their needs and vulnerabilities.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Volunteers; Youth

The video could be accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bft-_gKvt8

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.63
Country: Global, Regional

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies

Purpose

This study’s overall objective is to provide information on the collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD), and gender and generational analyses of SADD. It is intended to inform assessment processes by humanitarian actors responding to natural disasters and situations of armed conflict.

Overview

  • The document focuses on five clusters (education, emergency shelter, food security, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)). Within each cluster, it presents information from the published literature on how gender and age matter within these sectors for people living in crises caused by natural disaster and armed conflict. It then draws on interviews and published literature to examine if SADD is collected by UN lead cluster agencies, their partners and local agencies operating within these clusters and if so what, if any, difference it makes for programming.
  • Collection and use of SADD and gender and generational analyses enable operational agencies to deliver assistance more effectively and efficiently than without those data and findings, as illustrated by case studies and examples.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Dyan Mazurana, Prisca Benelli, Huma Gupta and Peter Walker, “Sex and Age Matter: Improving Humanitarian Response in Emergencies.” Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, August 2011.

 

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3

Purpose

This document outlines four criteria for assessing project/programme plans.  The criteria might not be applicable to projects that do not deal directly with populations affected by crisis or at risk.

Overview

The four criteria are:

  • Gender and diversity analysis and sex- and age-disaggregated data: how does the project take into consideration differences between girls, boys, women and men of different age groups in terms of their roles, responsibilities and control over resources, including their level of access to assistance; effects of the crisis or risk; capacities for coping with, responding to, recovering from and preparing for crises; and specific needs expectations and constraints?
  • Adapted assistance/services: what measures are taken to ensure that assistance and services provided by the project are accessible, affordable, acceptable and appropriate to gender and diversity concerns?
  • Negative effects: are potential negative effects of the project/programme on sex/age and diverse groups identified and prevented or mitigated?
  • Adequate participation of vulnerable and at-risk groups: how are sex/age and diverse groups consulted, informed and integrated in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project?

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Norwegian Red Cross (20 January 2015). Gender and Diversity Requirements for Project Planning, Annex 3. Pp.2-69.  Available from: https://www.rodekors.no/Global/HK%20-%20Hovedkontoret/Internasjonal/Dokumenter/Gender/Final%20report,%20NorCross%20Gender%20Plan%20of%20Action%202009-2014.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All

School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All

Purpose

This paper highlights some of the available evidence on School-Related Gender-Based violence (SRGBV) and presents new analysis of data from international and regional learning assessments. It highlights the gaps in our ability to track SRGBV and respond to it effectively.

The paper also draws on lessons learned from successful interventions to document what works to address SRGBV, and makes policy recommendations for global and national stakeholders.

Overview

  • SRGBV is an appalling phenomenon that undermines efforts to provide good quality education and achieve Education for All. It has consequences on attendance, learning and completion of all learners, and has wider negative impacts on families and communities.
  • Schools are the place where SRGBV occurs, but they are also the place where it can stop. Schools should be learning environments where social norms and gender inequalities are challenged and transformed, including attitudes and practices condoning violence. SRGBV cannot be addressed unless it is better understood. The inability to recognise and respond to SRGBV prevents the transformation of schools into empowering spaces for girls, boys and teachers.
  • The international community will soon confirm its post-2015 commitment to ‘ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This laudable goal will not be achieved unless gender is recognised as a driving factor in school violence, strong monitoring frameworks are adopted and genuine commitment is made to eliminate gender-based violence in schools.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: UNESCO (March 2015). School-Related Gender-Based Violence is Preventing the Achievement of Quality Education for All. Pp.1-16. Available from: http://www.ungei.org/resources/files/232107E.pdf [Accessed: 18 July 2016].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: UNESCO
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.86
Country: Regional
Resource type: Report, Research

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Audio visual: Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth

Audio visual: Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth

Purpose

This video provides an overview of the Canadian Red Cross Tool  ’ Ten steps to creating safe environments for children and youth’

Overview

The ten steps are:

  1. Be aware: Understanding abuse, violence, bullying, and harassment.
  2. Look all ways: recognising risks to all children and young people, both male and female
  3. Learn the rules of the road: the law and your responsibilities
  4. Create a prevention team
  5. Be alert: assess the risk in your organisation
  6. Develop policies and procedures that work
  7. Teach all the adults and all the kids all the issues and staying safe
  8. Know how to respond when young people are being hurt
  9. Keep working your way through the obstacles and roadblocks. It takes time and dedication
  10. Stay on course for safe environments

Usage: Guidance for project implementation, Training

Audiences: Technical staff; Gender and Diversity Practitioners

YouTube linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A02Ko5Eosro

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: Other Size (MB): Size: 12
Country: Regional

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Rapid Assessment Guide for Psychosocial Support and Violence Prevention in Emergencies and Recovery

Rapid Assessment Guide for Psychosocial Support and Violence Prevention in Emergencies and Recovery

Purpose

This guide provides standards and directions on how to carry out rapid needs assessment for Psychosocial Support (PSS) and Violence Prevention (VP) initiatives including child protection and sexual and gender-based violence.

In particular, this rapid assessment tool is designed to help gather data in an efficient and effective way to help inform integration of PSS and VP issues, as minimum standards, into the broader disaster management action plans in response to an emergency.

Overview

  • Part 1 of the guide looks at setting up an assessment. This includes issues such as: standards; ethical guidelines for conducting an assessment (do no harm); ethical guidelines for conducting assessments with children; the approach; and forming an assessment team.
  • Part 2 deals with focus group discussions / questions for qualitative data collection: why it is important; and specific detailed questions for greater depth.
  • Part 3 looks at the situation/context questionnaire: why it is important; questions on physical layout of the community; questions on community leadership structure; overview of violence; questions on reports of violence; and reporting/referrals.
  • Part 4 is an environmental walk-around: an examination of the community/camp from which data is being collected from the perspective of the assessment team.
  • Part 5 deals with the internal questionnaire for leadership of the National Society; and
  • Part 6 looks at the importance of analysis checklists.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: Canadian Red Cross and IFRC (2015). Rapid Assessment Guide for Psychosocial Support and Violence Prevention in Emergencies and Recovery. Pp. 2-48. Available from: http://pscentre.org/wp-content/uploads/PSS-and-VP-Rapid-Assessment-Tool-Emergencies-and-Recovery-2015.pdf [Accessed: 18th July 2016].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date: January 1, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 5.08
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Gender in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion – Guidance Note

Gender in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion – Guidance Note

Purpose

This guidance note provides an overview of gender and diversity issues and practicalities to be considered when designing water, sanitation and hygiene promotion programmes.

The note contains case studies from Mozambique, Pakistan and Somalia.

Overview

Women, girls, boys, men, and vulnerable groups (older people, LGBTI, PLHIV and people living with disabilities) all need to be reached through water, sanitation and hygiene programmes. Each group’s needs, role and involvement must be identified to ensure that a culturally appropriate programme is designed and implemented.

In developing countries, women and girls often spend most of their time carrying out domestic chores and walking long distances to collect and transport water. Lack of access to water points and sanitation facilities has an impact on their health and access to education. Men and boys need water for irrigation, and tending to livestock. Their need for water is different from women and girls.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Gender and diversity practitioners; Technical staff

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.40
Country: Global
Resource type: Briefing paper, Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Eliminating Health Inequities – Every Woman and Every Child Counts

Eliminating Health Inequities – Every Woman and Every Child Counts

Purpose

This report provides evidence that health inequities can, and need to be, addressed through a holistic approach.

It contains a number of case studies from Egypt, Bangladesh, Malawi, Ecuador, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Austria.

Overview

  • Health inequities, and the resulting social injustice, are closely linked with other issues such as poverty, gender inequality and human rights violations which, in turn, have an impact on education, transport, health, agriculture, and overall well-being. Interventions should therefore be multi-sectoral, going beyond health to address social and economic determinants such as malnutrition, alcohol abuse, poor housing, indoor air pollution and poverty.
  • Women and children are the focus of attention for three reasons: 1. Women are more likely to face health inequities because their biological make-up demands more care. Pregnancy and childbirth are life events that expose women to greater risks; 2. Women are the gateway to improving the health of an entire population, starting with their children and members of their households; 3. The burden of caring for sick children and the elderly mainly falls on mothers and other female carers.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.76
Country: Global, Regional
Tagged in: Children, Elderly, Youth
Resource type: Report, Research

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Voices of Ethnic Minority Children – Participatory Video on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in Vietnam

Voices of Ethnic Minority Children – Participatory Video on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in Vietnam

Purpose

This publication introduces the Participatory Video (PV) methodology as a tool to amplify the voices of traditionally excluded groups who are greatly affected by disasters. The publication outlines the steps involved in carrying out the PV process held in Vietnam in late 2010. It also highlights the lessons learnt from the project and provides recommendations.

Overview

The PV was held with the participation of 12 children (six boys and six girls) from two communes – Thuan and A Ngo. The resulting films were to be used in those communes and in 10 additional Quang Tri communes that are part of the DIPECHO-funded project for community and government awareness and advocacy.

The PV methodology supports an empowering process whereby community members become drivers of change and are empowered to act on local knowledge by creating information videos that can help them prioritise and express their needs. The participatory video methodology involves awareness-raising, capacity-building and people-centred decision-making processes which can be built from the local level, to district, national and international levels.

Usage: Training, Learning from experience

Audience: Technical staff; Volunteers

Reference: Tamara Plush & Nguyen Trong Ninh. Voices of ethnic minority children: Participatory video on disaster risk reduction and climate change in Vietnam. Plan International in Vietnam, European Commission Humanitarian Aid. Pp. 1-10. Available from: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/26509_26509planparticipatoryvideoindrrpro.pdf [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.02
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Guidelines

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

Gender and Disaster Management

Gender and Disaster Management

Purpose

This briefing paper looks at the importance of gender within Red Cross disaster management and offers some suggestions about how Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies might integrate gender into programmes and strategies.

Overview

Gender shapes the extent to which men, women, boys and girls are vulnerable to, and affected by, emergencies and disasters. It affects the kinds of responses that are feasible in different communities and societies. Understanding that men and women face different obstacles can help the development of more effective programmes and ensure that needs are met.

Programmes should include provision for gender-specific needs, including: appropriate clothing and hygiene supplies; safe transportation; childcare in relief centres; reproductive health services and anti-violence services.

Usage: Policy development , Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff; National Society leadership; Gender and diversity practitioners

Reference: Australian Red Cross. Gender and disaster management. Pp.1-8. Available from: http://www.redcross.org.au/gender-briefing-papers.aspx [Accessed: 19th September 2015].

No ratings yet.

Rate This!

Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 8.12
Country: Regional
Resource type: Briefing paper

You might be interested in these resources:

Rate this!

[an error occurred while processing the directive]