Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit – Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014

Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit – Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014

Purpose

This document provides a review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers (ECV) Manual and Toolkit and its rollout in Asia Pacific. It includes case studies on the use of the toolkit in a number of countries in Asia Pacific.

Overview

  • The evaluation found the original English text to be clear and simple to understand, although there was some duplication between sections of sessions 2 and 3, especially in relation to the roles and expectations of volunteers. Graphics and drawings required contextualisation. National Societies were advised to adapt illustrations to their own settings.
  • The original ECV toolkit and manual covers 17 of the most common diseases occurring during epidemics. There are some diseases with epidemic potential that are not included in the toolkit. Some National Societies decided to include additional diseases after consultation with their national health authorities. The addition required a significantly higher degree of work compared with those disease pages that required translation and adaptation only. In some cases, the addition of new diseases to the tool delayed the whole production process.
  • The rollout of the toolkit was highly relevant and effective in meeting countries’ needs, epidemic priorities and in the contexts of the community programmes. The strategy of sensitising the leadership of National Societies and relevant national authorities as the first step has proven to be highly effective in beginning the rollout of ECV as this helped pave the way for mainstreaming it into National Societies’ health programmes or those of national authorities, as well as emergency contingency planning. The approach of mainstreaming and integration into existing health or disaster management programmes was also widely recognised as appropriate to ensure sustainability and optimal use of resources.
  • Recommendations from the evaluation include: keeping it simple; keeping it flexible; the need for National Societies to consider the toolkit as their tool, not an IFRC programme; keeping the training timeframe adaptable; considering additional options – online training, (and, for example, offline CDs); improving advocacy and the dissemination of the materials.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2015). Review of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ Toolkit. Rollout in Asia Pacific, 2011 – 2014. (pp. 1-72).

See related document: Epidemic Control for Volunteers: A Training Manual

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.7
Country: Regional
Resource type: Research

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The Role of Social Capital in Strengthening Disaster Resilience in Thailand

The Role of Social Capital in Strengthening Disaster Resilience in Thailand

Purpose

This study aims contribute to the existing evidence base on how social capital can be harnessed to strengthen disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Thailand. While social capital is generally recognised as an important means to building community resilience, there is still little knowledge about how it can be best utilised towards DRR efforts. The study is based on a literature review and field work carried out in three communities in Thailand.

Overview

  • The study finds that, despite the attachment and harmony that people feel towards their community, levels of social trust are low. This has implications not only for Thai communities’ abilities to respond to, and cope with, disasters, but also in their abilities to prosper and thrive as a nation.
  • Thai communities are built on strong family ties and on strong bonds with friends and neighbours. It is a society of very strong immediate networks, in that very few people lack a support network. However, this means that, for the minority that do lack social capital, life can be extremely difficult. As such, investments in social capital must ensure that they are broad-based and inclusive, with a focus on integrating marginalised populations, such as undocumented migrant communities or political and religious minorities.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.5
Country: Thailand
Resource type: Research

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Of Norms, Networks, and Trust. The Role of Social Capital in Reinforcing Community Resilience

Of Norms, Networks, and Trust. The Role of Social Capital in Reinforcing Community Resilience

Purpose

This study analyses the role of social capital in community resilience.  The paper bases its analysis on recent literature and on case studies from nine communities in Nepal, China and Myanmar. The research included a household survey with 888 respondents, and workshops with communities and Red Cross branches.

Overview

  • Cognitive aspects of social capital such as social embeddedness, trust and propensity to civic engagement appear to be the critical foundation on which overall resilience depends. The case of Bingalar, a Myanmar village severely affected by the 2008 Cyclone Nargis, where villagers supported each other through the first days of hardship and recovery, illustrates how social capital can make a tremendous difference to resilience and overall outcomes.
  • Social capital is one of the key driving forces behind community resilience – the others being economic, human, physical and natural capital.
  • The study finds that existing IFRC tools can be used to assess structural aspects of social capital if they are properly understood and used. For instance, the baseline survey tool (part of the VCA toolkit) needs to be complemented with a component that can capture cognitive social capital.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.11
Country: Regional
Resource type: Research

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The road to resilience – Bridging relief and development for a more sustainable future, IFRC discussion paper on resilience 2012

The road to resilience – Bridging relief and development for a more sustainable future, IFRC discussion paper on resilience 2012

Purpose:

The purpose of this document is to present key partners with the IFRC’s definition of, and perspectives on, resilience. It includes case studies from America, Asia and Africa.

Overview:

  • For the IFRC, resilience is defined as the ability of individuals, communities, organisations, or countries exposed to disasters and crises and underlying vulnerabilities to anticipate, reduce the impact of, cope with, and recover from the effects of adversity without compromising their long-term.
  • Interventions to strengthen resilience aim to: (a) address underlying causes of vulnerability in order to protect development; (b) reduce and mitigate radical drops in resilience caused by disasters and crises; and (c) enhance bouncing back from adversity.
  • To strengthen resilience there is a need to accept that people come first. Resilience is not something outsiders can do, or bring to individuals or communities; one must respect local ownership. Dependency on outside support or substitution should be avoided as much as possible. It is also necessary to engage in comprehensive cross-sector assessments, planning and implementation, and to develop a long-term perspective. Strengthening resilience does not happen overnight and requires long-term engagement and investment; working in partnership; knowing the limits; and strengthening disaster laws and policies.
  • Characteristics of a resilient community, with case studies, can be found on pp. 17-25.

 

Usage:Guidance for project implementation

Audience: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date: June 1, 2012
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 1.6
Country: Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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Beneficiary Communication and Accountability. A Responsibility, Not a Choice: Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Beneficiary Communication and Accountability. A Responsibility, Not a Choice: Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Purpose

This document outlines lessons learned from recent beneficiary communication and accountability (BCA) programmes in Indonesia, Haiti and Pakistan and provides recommendations and emerging guidelines for volunteers and staff in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement on how to incorporate BCA into emergency response, recovery and development work.

Overview

  • Programme Delivery: BCA programming should go beyond one-way information, and instead form a two-way dialogue with communities, to support well-informed and better quality programming and advocacy. Two-way communication should become a priority in the recovery phase of a disaster programme if not before; communication with beneficiaries is more effective when the information is relevant, accessible, clear and timely. Multiple channels and methods should be used to communicate and link these; sharing all information, both positive and negative, builds community trust in the organisation. A beneficiary communication and accountability plan should also be developed that involves a society’s stakeholders and clearly defines roles and responsibilities.
  • Strategy and leadership: Develop a BCA policy that explains the programme; integrate BCA processes into existing key policy and guidelines; articulate the link between BCA and accountability to beneficiaries.
  • Organisational structure and programme title: Embed the BCA programme within sector programme teams, when possible, and consider changing the title of the programme to reflect links to accountability.
  • Resources (technical, financial and human): Invest in capacity-building of BCA volunteers and staff and the technology to support programming; modify BCA volunteer and staff terms of reference to reflect expanded functions of the beneficiary communication role.
  • Skill-sharing processes and internal networks: Raise awareness of the importance of BCA approaches to stakeholders through training, and internal and external communication.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff, Communication staff, Volunteers

Citation: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2011). Beneficiary Communication and Accountability. A Responsibility, Not a Choice: Lessons Learned and Recommendations (pp. 1-68).

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2.1
Resource type: Guidelines

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Final Evaluation of the Mangrove Plantation and Disaster Risk Reduction in the Period of 2011-2015

Final Evaluation of the Mangrove Plantation and Disaster Risk Reduction in the Period of 2011-2015

Purpose

This report presents findings of the Final Evaluation of the Vietnam Red Cross (VNRC) Mangrove Plantation and Disaster Risk Reduction (MP-DRR) programme for 2011-2015. Specifically, the following issues were considered as to whether the programme had achieved its expected results regarding: plantation of forest and sustainable forest protection; improved capacity of communes (under the project) to protect against disasters and impacts of climate change; and strengthened capacity of the VNRC to develop and implement community based disaster-risk management (CBDRM) projects sustainably and effectively.

Overview

  • Consistency with government legislation and donor priorities: There is high-level political interest and resulting legislation for mangrove and forest protection by the government at national and provincial levels.
  • Cost-efficiency: Overall, the MP-DRR is efficient as it produces benefits far outweighing its costs. These benefits are protective, direct economic, and ecological.
  • Effectiveness: The MP-DRR has been underway for almost two decades and is divided into four phases. Through the project is managed by the Vietnam Red Cross at all levels, especially communication on mangrove protection, development and disaster-risk reduction, the importance of mangroves and risk reduction activities in the ten provinces has entered deeply into the minds of local people, government officials, teachers and their students.
  • Impact: The MP-DRR brings benefit to an estimated 190,455 direct beneficiaries and many more indirect beneficiaries.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: Asian Management and Development Institute (October 2015). Final Evaluation of the Mangrove Plantation and Disaster Risk Reduction in the Period of 2011-2015 (pp. 1-72).

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 2
Country: Regional

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Vietnam: Country Case Study Report. How Law and Regulation Support Disaster Risk Reduction

Vietnam: Country Case Study Report. How Law and Regulation Support Disaster Risk Reduction

Purpose

This case study explores the extent to which legal frameworks in Vietnam support national and local disaster risk reduction (DRR) efforts against natural hazards. It covers a wide range of law and regulatory issues including the integration of DRR into disaster management laws, institutional arrangements, liability, early warning systems, infrastructure, building codes, land use planning, environmental management/climate change adaptation, awareness-raising and education.

Overview

  • Law and regulation is crucial to the current successes in DRR in Vietnam. Although there remain some gaps in the legal framework and its implementation, the new disaster risk management (DRM) law seems likely to address many of these gaps.
  • Many effective DRR mechanisms in Vietnam are supported by legal frameworks which detail the institutional framework, implementation methods, allocation of financial resources, and clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Responsibilities are now more clearly allocated and defined under the new DRM law, but the well-established implementation mechanisms through responsible ministries and People’s Committees (PCs) remain in place under the new DRM Law. These mechanisms assist in integrating DRR principles into the legal and policy environment in Vietnam which, in turn, contributes to sustainable development and community resilience in the face of natural hazards.

 

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: Tukker, H. & Chinh, N. C. (May 2014). Vietnam: Country Case Study Report. How Law and Regulation Support Disaster Risk Reduction. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (pp. 1-86).

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Author: IFRC, UNDP
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3.6
Country: Vietnam
Theme(s): Disaster law
Resource type: Case study, Report, Review

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Cyclone Giri Relief Operation: Lessons Learnt Workshop Report 2011

Cyclone Giri Relief Operation: Lessons Learnt Workshop Report 2011

Purpose: 

The report hihglighted the lessons learnt and challenges faced from Myanmar Red Cross Society’s experiences.

Overview:

The seminar was undertaken as a means to highlight achievements and challenges during the Cyclone Giri emergency response, and provide recommendations for future relief operations in Myanmar. Main contents include:

  • Introduction, objectives, agenda, methodology
  • Early Warning System, Findings  of group work on assesment, relief distribution and restoring family links, coordination, communication, financial management, transportation and logistics, volunteering
  • Recommendations and conclusion

Usage: Learning from experience, Training

Audience: Technical staff, Volunteers

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Publication date: March 31, 2011
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.13
Country: Myanmar
Resource type: Report

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Epidemic preparedness in Indonesia

Epidemic preparedness in Indonesia

Purpose

This document looks the roll-out of the Epidemic Control for Volunteer (ECV) toolkit and training manual, its implementation and analysis from the context of the Indonesian Red Cross (PMI).

Four provincial branches were chosen to initiate the project and field test the toolkit between November 2013 and February 2015: Banten, Daerah Khusus Ibukota (DKI) Jakarta, Jawa Barat and Papua. The branches were selected based on epidemic risks and their capacity and interest in supporting the introduction of the manual and toolkit.

Overview

  • Before implementation began in November 2013, Palang Merah Indonesia (PMI) conducted sensitisation sessions with the leadership and key staff of different headquarter divisions. The goal of these sessions was to secure support and maximise the potential for integration of the tool in community programming. Sensitisation sessions were also held with key external stakeholders.
  • The Ministry of Health in Indonesia committed to cooperating with PMI on the adaptation of materials. An external consultant was hired to oversee the completion of the translation, graphic design and layout of the adapted material.
  • PMI started by conducting a three-day training course to create a group of ‘master trainers’ of staff and volunteers in the selected provinces. This group was then equipped to lead branch and community trainings, and facilitate the roll out of the toolkit in their communities.
  • Although the ECV project improved the National Society’s capacities, some challenges and constraints emerged (see p. 6 of the report).

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: Palang Merah Indonesia (PMI) (2015). Epidemic Preparedness in Indonesia: Adaptation and Roll-out of IFRC’s Epidemic Control for Volunteer (ECV) Toolkit and Training Manual (pp.1-6).

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Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.75
Country: Indonesia
Resource type: Case study, Research

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Epidemic Preparedness in Myanmar

Epidemic Preparedness in Myanmar

Purpose

This document is a case study of the adaptation and roll-out of the Epidemic Control for Volunteers’ (ECV) Toolkit and Training Manual in Myanmar.

The roll-out of the ECV Toolkit in Myanmar targeted five communities in Leiwei Township with a population of approximately 11,870 people (2,660 households).

Overview

  • First, a coordination and sensitization meeting on epidemic prevention and control was held. It brought together Myanmar Red Cross Society leadership and management representatives from various departments, Ministry of Health officials and the IFRC country office. In addition to this meeting, two sensitization and contingency-planning workshops, based on potential outbreaks of priority diseases, were conducted for Myanmar Red Cross Society staff and volunteers. The ECV toolkit was translated and adapted for the local context. A three-day training session was held to create a group of Myanmar Red Cross Society ‘master trainers’ who would ensure the ECV toolkit was rolled out within the communities where they worked.
  • Overall, the project has supported the Myanmar Red Cross Society to increase community preparedness to seasonal disease outbreaks and epidemics, including potential, emerging, infections in the country. The roll-out of the ECV toolkit improved the capacity of Myanmar Red Cross Society volunteers to deliver good quality services to the community and to guide the immediate action of volunteers in response to any epidemic or its threat.
  • Some of the challenges faced include: the need for more time than was originally planned; difficulty recruiting project staff due to a lack of experienced applicants; translation and adaption of ECV toolkits taking more time than expected. A full list can be found on pp. 4-5.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audiences: Technical staff

Citation: Myanmar Red Cross Society (2015). Epidemic Preparedness in Myanmar (pp. 1-6).

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Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.77
Country: Myanmar
Resource type: Case study

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