Joint Action Plan for technical collaboration between Red Cross Red Crescent and AHA Centre)

Joint Action Plan for technical collaboration between Red Cross Red Crescent and AHA Centre)

Purpose:

 

Overview:

 

Usage: Learning from experience

Audience: National Society leadership, Technical staff

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.4
Country: Regional
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Resource type: Briefing paper

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Setting up a National Disaster Preparedness and Response Mechanism: Guidelines for National Societies

Setting up a National Disaster Preparedness and Response Mechanism: Guidelines for National Societies

Purpose

This publication presents a set of practical guidelines to support National Societies in developing the processes, systems, teams and individuals involved in preparing for and responding to, disasters. The guidelines acknowledge that response is, first and foremost, local but that it takes place within the global solidarity of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

It includes case studies from Pakistan, Tajikistan, Belize and Sudan.

Overview

  • The first stage in creating a National Disaster Preparedness and Response Mechanism is to develop the political will to do so. This decision must be supported by leadership at the top of the National Society in question. Section 1 of the document explains how to develop the political will within a National Society to set up the mechanism. This is done by linking the mechanism with global priorities, taking the decision to establish and support the mechanism and, finally, defining the general direction and allocating resources accordingly.
  • The next step is to ensure that the conditions are viable to establish the mechanism. Section 2 sets out the tasks involved in ensuring that the conditions are ready. First, this means making sure that all staff and volunteers understand the National Society and its wider context, and accept the need for the mechanism. It also involves linking the mechanism to existing operations, integrating policy into strategy and planning, and planning for implementation and sustainability.
  • The final stage in establishing the mechanism is to ensure that it is ready to operate successfully. Section 3 outlines the key steps in implementing the mechanism. This involves putting in place effective procedures for recruitment, capacity-building and high-quality deployment. It also comprises work to coordinate operations with other international response activities, integrate the mechanism teams in existing operations, monitoring and evaluation, and guaranteeing continuity and sustainability.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation; Policy development

Audiences: National Society leadership; Technical staff; Human Resources

Citation: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2010). Setting up a National Disaster Preparedness and Response Mechanism: Guidelines for National Societies (pp. 1-64).

For other related information, click here: Video on Setting up a Disaster Preparedness and Response Mechanism

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Author: IFRC
Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 0.5
Country: Global, Regional
Resource type: Guidelines

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A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Purpose:

This guide has been developed to support Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and IFRC staff in more systematically integrating risk reduction measures into their planning. It describes in detail what key issues need to be considered, and when. The guidance aims at ensuring that risk reduction measures are taken into account in different sectors and contexts. It also details the key elements that need to be in place to create an enabling environment.

Overview:

  • General steps for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) are: DRR and CCA screening. The strategy, policy, programme or project in question must be first screened with a DRR and CCA lens, and then a detailed assessment made. If this shows that disaster and climate change risks have not been duly considered or addressed, then adjustments should be made to the planned activity. A monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework should also be developed. Mainstreaming DRR and CCA can be ensured only when the process is regularly monitored and evaluated.
  • The paper details six specific programming contexts (conflict, urban, reducing vulnerability, strengthening resilience, disaster preparedness, disaster response, and recovery) and key sectors (health and care; water, sanitation and hygiene; migration; shelter and settlement; livelihood and food security; natural resource management) for mainstreaming DRR and CCA. Each of these is accompanied by specific key principles of DRR and CCA mainstreaming, as well as good practice checklists. Aside from the context-specific guidance, there are two general principles: first, a National Society needs to ensure that it has adequate capacity at relevant levels to mainstream DRR and CCA; second, given that risk patterns change, risk should be monitored at least once per year. If changes in circumstances and risk are identified, programming choices and activities may need to be adapted to these changes.
  • A gender good practice checklist can be found on p.52.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audiences: Technical staff

Reference: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2013). A Guide to Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation (pp. 1-62).

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National Society survey findings report 2015 on community safety and resilience

National Society survey findings report 2015 on community safety and resilience

Purpose: 

The survey was conducted to give an overview of National Societies priorities and initiatives.

The survey was conducted in 2015 prior to the Southeast Asia Regional Community Safety and Resilience Forum in the same year, and gathered the inputs of 8 National Societies out of the total 11. The survey was self-assessment of the National Societies and was not an assessment by the IFRC.

Overview:

The survey was conducted in several topics: integrated approach; response preparedness; gender and diversity; disaster law; partnership; learning, sharing and the use of social media; and project implementation.

The report also presents the interest mapping of National Society, that is the themes/topics that each of them is interested to learn or to share.

Usage: Learning from experience

Audience: National Society leadership and Technical staff

Chart 1: Integrated approach and regional map - Infographics

Chart 1: Integrated approach and regional map – Infographics

Chart 2: Response preparedness - Infographics

Chart 2: Response preparedness – Infographics

Chart 3: Gender and diversity - Infographics

Chart 3: Gender and diversity – Infographics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Document Data

Author: IFRC
Publication date: July 30, 2015
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Regional

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Sphere Handbook, Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response

Sphere Handbook, Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response

 

Purpose: The minimum standards are designed for planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation during humanitarian response in order for disaster-affected populations to survive and recover in stable conditions and with dignity. It is also an effective advocacy tool when negotiating for humanitarian space and for the provision of resources with authorities.

Overview: The minimum standards are sets of standards for humanitarian response and is used as an inter-agency communication and coordination tool. It has three main sections:

  • Introduction about the Sphere project and the Handbook
  • Key standards: Humanitarian Charter, Protection Principles, Core Standards
  • Minimum standards in four cross-cutting issues including: water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion; food security and nutrition; shelter, settlement and non-food items; and health action.

Usage: Guidance for project implementation

Audience: Technical staff, Gender and Diversity Practitioners, Communication staff, Volunteers

For Vietnamese version, click here Tiếng Việt, size 2 MB

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Document Data

Publication date:
Status: Final Type: PDF Size (MB): Size: 3
Country: Vietnam
Resource type: Guidelines

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